Wogan, who sadly died of cancer aged 77 earlier this year, fronted the song contest from 1971 until 2008. His dry, sardonic remarks became synonymous with Eurovision night, despite producer Christer Bjorkman recently accusing him of “totally spoiling” it for British audiences.

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Getty Sir Terry Wogan's gentle mickey-taking was a fan favourite

Norton is fully aware of Wogan’s legacy and has praised him for “taking a role that wasn’t really a role at all and totally transforming it into the job it is today”.

Earlier this month the Mirror told how producer Bjorkman said if it had been up to him he would not have hired Sir Terry to host the competition.

“I think this year will be bittersweet because we will all be thinking of Terry and I am sure I will say a few words about him as the night goes on as it is a night that will forever be associated with Terry Wogan.”

Terry Wogan: the late broadcaster told RTÉ some good stories

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Eurovision host Graham Norton has defended the legacy of Sir Terry Wogan saying: “When I do the commentary I still hear him in my head.”

Norton has also revealed that he will be toasting Wogan during song number nine, which is when he said it was time to crack open the Bucks Fizz.

She added: “Terry was the face of Eurovision, to the point where other countries watched him because he was so funny, topical, witty and right.

And Graham, 53, revealed he will even “raise a glass” live on air to the late star, who died in January aged 77.

“It has all worked out very nicely as Swedish people in the arena will be cheering their song in the stadium as everyone back in the UK will join me and say cheers to the memory and legacy of Sir Terry Wogan.”

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As someone so deeply invested in the Charity, he personified everything BBC Children in Need aims to achieve; that children and young people have a safe, happy and secure childhood, with the chance to reach their full potential.

Read more: Eurovision chief accuses late Sir Terry Wogan of 'ruining the show with his mockery'

“When I am doing the commentary I still hear Sir Terry in my head as I am sure lots of other people do too,” he said. “I think this year it will be bittersweet because we will all be thinking of Terry and I am sure I will say a few words about him as the night goes on as it is a night that will forever be associated with him.”

“When I am doing the commentary I still hear Sir Terry in my head as I am sure lots of other people do too.

It was the Irishman George Bernard Shaw who pointed out that the English ear is so attuned to class that it’s impossible for one Englishman to open his mouth without another Englishman hating him. Presumably this is one of the reasons why Irish broadcasters such as Wogan have prospered here. The English ear finds them impossible to classify. My personal favourite of this euphonious breed is Sean Rafferty, who can happily be found fluting his way through In Tune (Weekdays, 4.30pm, Radio 3).

He said: “For those who aren’t aware song number nine is famous because Sir Terry always warned me not to have anything to drink until that point.

It comes after Swedish producer Christer Bjorkman singled out much-loved presenter Wogan for criticism claiming his gentle mickey-taking shattered the show’s credibility.

Getty Terry Wogan has been described as "the face of Eurovision"

"Mr Bjorkman obviously hasn’t got the British/ Irish sense of humour. We love to make fun of ourselves.”

“Sir Terry always warned me not to have anything to drink until that point,” he said. “During song number nine this year the host country Sweden will be performing and I will be encouraging everyone to raise a glass. 

Few broadcasters are able to match the late Irish DJ’s comforting tones, but there are still some great voices to be found on the BBC

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Terry Wogan legacy

As Life President of BBC Children in Need, Sir Terry Wogan made a real impact upon millions of young lives across the UK.

“At song number nine this year the host country Sweden will be performing and I will be encouraging everyone to raise a glass.

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Late Eurovision legend Sir Terry Wogan will be at the forefront of Graham Norton’s mind when he leads the BBC’s commentary on Saturday night.

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"He took a role that wasn’t really a role at all and he totally transformed it into the job it is today.

But Graham, who replaced Wogan in 2008, said: “ Sir Terry Wogan will always be associated with Eurovision .

The presenter plans a special toast to the legendary broadcaster at a critical moment in this evening's song contest

But many of his fans hit back and 1981 Eurovision winner Cheryl Baker, 62, branded the comments “disrespectful”.

“It has all worked out very nicely as Swedish people in the arena will be cheering their song in the stadium as everyone back in the UK will join me and cheers the memory and legacy of Sir Terry Wogan.”

Eurovision 2016 is only a matter of weeks away, so how much do you remember about the past 60 years of the contest that brought us ABBA?

Sir Terry leaves behind a great legacy, and one we will continue to safeguard. Whether having invited him into our homes via our televisions and radios, or working with him first-hand, we are all fortunate to have known Sir Terry Wogan and we will work hard to continue his memory.