Llamas contribute much more than transportation to the human communities in which they live. Leather is made from their hides, and their wool is crafted into ropes, rugs, and fabrics. Llama excrement is dried and burned for fuel. Even in death, llamas can serve their human owners—some people slaughter them and eat their meat.

The child will take on the appearance of one of the parents as if by a coin flip. The strength is chosen as a random integer between 1 and the strength of the stronger parent, inclusive. 3% of the time the resulting strength is increased by 1, but it's still capped at 5. For quick reference, consult the following table.

Llamas graze on grass and, like cows, regurgitate their food and chew it as cud. They chomp on such wads for some time before swallowing them for complete digestion. Llamas can survive by eating many different kinds of plants, and they need little water. These attributes make them durable and dependable even in sparse mountainous terrain.

The llama (/ˈlɑːmə/; Spanish: [ˈʝama] locally: [ˈʎama] or [ˈʒama]) (Lama glama) is a domesticated South American camelid, widely used as a meat and pack animal by Andean cultures since the Pre-Columbian era.

For field breeding, a female is turned out into a field with a male llama and left there for some period of time. This is the easiest method in terms of labor, but the least useful in terms of prediction of a likely birth date. An ultrasound test can be performed, and together with the exposure dates, a better idea of when the cria is expected can be determined.

The name llama (in the past also spelled 'lama' or 'glama') was adopted by European settlers from native Peruvians.[5]

The sound of the llama making groaning noises or going "mwa" is often a sign of fear or anger. If a llama is agitated, it will lay its ears back. One may determine how agitated the llama is by the materials in the spit. The more irritated the llama is, the further back into each of the three stomach compartments it will try to draw materials from for its spit.

Llamas, which are well-socialized and trained to halter and lead after weaning, are very friendly and pleasant to be around. They are extremely curious and most will approach people easily. However, llamas that are bottle-fed or over-socialized and over-handled as youth will become extremely difficult to handle when mature, when they will begin to treat humans as they treat each other, which is characterized by bouts of spitting, kicking and neck wrestling.[citation needed]

While the social structure might always be changing, they live as a family and they do take care of each other. If one notices a strange noise or feels threatened, a warning bray is sent out and all others become alert. They will often hum to each other as a form of communication.

An "orgle" is the mating sound of a llama or alpaca, made by the sexually aroused male. The sound is reminiscent of gargling, but with a more forceful, buzzing edge. Males begin the sound when they become aroused and continue throughout the act of procreation – from 15 minutes to more than an hour.[24][25]

Looking for a special gift for you or a loved one? Why not adopt one of our gorgeous Llamas. Every adoption package runs for a full 12 months. We process and dispatch all adoption packages within 48 hours of ordering. Please note we can process adoptions to start from any date within a 2 month period from the order date

Differential characteristics between llamas and alpacas include the llama's larger size, longer head, and curved ears. Alpaca fiber is generally more expensive, but not always more valuable. Alpacas tend to have a more consistent color throughout the body. The most apparent visual difference between llamas and camels is that camels have a hump or humps and llamas do not.

Llamas will tend to repel wolves with their spitting, depending on their strength value. For llamas with strength 4 and 5, wolves will always run away,[1] and for weaker llamas, wolves will run away correspondingly less often.

Llamas drop 0–2 leather. They will also drop anything equipped, such as a carpet, a chest, and all the items in their inventory.

Llamas spawn naturally in extreme hills and savanna biomes, in herds. Their wool colors depend on what biome they are in.

Llama spit has entity data associated with it that contain various properties of the spit entity. Its entity ID is llama_spit. It produces spit particles when summoned, and obeys gravity. The spit entity on its own does not harm the player directly.

Llamas can be tamed similarly to horses. They can be tamed by right clicking on the llama until it shows hearts, however, even when tamed, the player can't control their movements when riding them. However, a lead can be attached to one, and when this happens, surrounding llamas will follow, making a caravan. A caravan can have up to ten llamas in it, including babies.

Scholar Alex Chepstow-Lusty has argued that the switch from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to widespread agriculture was only possible because of the use of llama dung as fertilizer.[34]

Llamas should be tested for pregnancy after breeding at two to three, six and at least 12 weeks.

They can also be equipped with carpets. Each carpet color yields a different pattern.

Llamas are neutral mobs which can be tamed and used to transport large shipments of items.

Find out what National Geographic Society is doing to save animals all over the world, and learn what you can do to help.

One of the main uses for llamas at the time of the Spanish conquest was to bring down ore from the mines in the mountains.[35] Gregory de Bolivar estimated that in his day, as many as 300,000 were employed in the transport of produce from the Potosí mines alone, but since the introduction of horses, mules, and donkeys, the importance of the llama as a beast of burden has greatly diminished.[36]

The height of a full-grown, full-size llama is 1.7 to 1.8 m (5.6 to 5.9 ft) tall at the top of the head, and can weigh between 130 and 200 kg (290 and 440 lb). At birth, a baby llama (called a cria) can weigh between 9 and 14 kg (20 and 31 lb). Llamas typically live for 15 to 25 years, with some individuals surviving 30 years or more.[1][2][3]

The loss of animal species is irreversible and potentially catastrophic, not to mention heartrendingly sad. Where do we stand? Face the facts with this quiz.

Llama

In harem breeding, the male is left with females most of the year.

Using llamas as livestock guards in North America began in the early 1980s, and some sheep producers have used llamas successfully since then.[26][27] They are used most commonly in the western regions of the United States, where larger predators, such as coyotes and feral dogs, are prevalent. Typically, a single gelding (castrated male) is used.

The Hawaiian monk seal is one of the oldest species of seal on the planet. But their tenure in paradise is perilously close to its end; only about 1,100 seals remain in the wild.

Llamas are willing pack animals but only to a point. An overloaded llama will simply refuse to move. These animals often lie down on the ground and they may spit, hiss, or even kick at their owners until their burden is lessened.

Llamas have an unusual reproductive cycle for a large animal. Female llamas are induced ovulators.[13] Through the act of mating, the female releases an egg and is often fertilized on the first attempt. Female llamas do not go into estrus ("heat").[14]

Options for feeding llamas are quite wide; a wide variety of commercial and farm-based feeds are available. The major determining factors include feed cost, availability, nutrient balance and energy density required. Young, actively growing llamas require a greater concentration of nutrients than mature animals because of their smaller digestive tract capacities.[22]

Llamas have a fine undercoat, which can be used for handicrafts and garments. The coarser outer guard hair is used for rugs, wall-hangings and lead ropes. The fiber comes in many different colors ranging from white or grey to reddish-brown, brown, dark brown and black.

In essential structural characteristics, as well as in general appearance and habits, all the animals of this genus very closely resemble each other, so whether they should be considered as belonging to one, two, or more species is a matter of controversy among naturalists.

In the Inca empire, llamas were the only beasts of burden, and many of the people dominated by the Inca had long traditions of llama herding. For the Inca nobility, the llama was of symbolic significance, and llama figures were often buried with the dead.[31] In South America, llamas are still used as beasts of burden, as well as for the production of fiber and meat.[32]

Like humans, llama males and females mature sexually at different rates. Females reach puberty at about 12 months old; males do not become sexually mature until around three years of age.[15]

The Inca deity Urcuchillay was depicted in the form of a multicolored llama.[33]

They’re rarely seen. Even less often photographed. Bryde’s whales rocket through Pacific shallows to gorge on fish. Dive in for more.

Llamas can be equipped with chests, giving it 3, 6, 9, 12, or 15 slots of inventory space, according to the NBT-tag "Strength" (see 'Data Values' below).

Using llamas as guards has reduced the losses to predators for many producers. The value of the livestock saved each year more than exceeds the purchase cost and annual maintenance of a llama. Although not every llama is suited to the job, most are a viable, nonlethal alternative for reducing predation, requiring no training and little care.[28]

Select a column based on the stronger parent. Wild means there are no parents, e.g. a llama spawned by world generation or a spawn egg. Select a row to find the probability of the resulting llama having a specific strength.