offspring are all produced in a single group (litter, clutch, etc.), after which the parent usually dies. Semelparous organisms often only live through a single season/year (or other periodic change in conditions) but may live for many seasons. In both cases reproduction occurs as a single investment of energy in offspring, with no future chance for investment in reproduction.

found in the oriental region of the world. In other words, India and southeast Asia.

Drosophila melanogaster (from Greek, meaning black-bellied dew-lover) is a two-winged insect that belongs to the Diptera, the order of true flies. The species is commonly known as the fruit fly, and is one of the most commonly used model organisms in biology, including studies in genetics, physiology and life-history evolution. Flies belonging to the Tephritidae are also called fruit flies, which often leads to confusion.

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having a worldwide distribution. Found on all continents (except maybe Antarctica) and in all biogeographic provinces; or in all the major oceans (Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific.

The D. melanogaster lifespan is about 30 days at 29 °C (84 °F).

The gene network (transcriptional and protein interactions) governing the early development of the fruit fly embryo is one of the most understood gene networks to date, especially relating to patterning along the antero-posterior (AP) and dorso-ventral (DV) axes.

After isolating the fly breeding ground, control methods may be utilized. Although eradication may require several treatments, the lack of food available to fly populations will eventually cause them to die out.

Fruit flies have an open circulatory system as its cardiovascular system.

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Characteristics of Drosophila flight may be dominated by the viscosity of the air, rather than the inertia of the fly body, but the opposite case with inertia as the dominant force may occur.[44] However, subsequent work showed that while the viscous effects on the insect body during flight may be negligible, the aerodynamic forces on the wings themselves actually cause fruit flies' turns to be damped viscously.[45]

The knowledge of the phylogeny of this family is incomplete. The family is subdivided in two subfamilies, the Drosophilinae and the Steganinae. The two subfamilies do not contain a single morphological character that distinguishes them. However, the combination of characteristics is sufficient to assign species correctly to the subfamilies. Most molecular phylogeny studies focus on the genus Drosophila and related genera.

During oogenesis, cytoplasmic bridges called "ring canals" connect the forming oocyte to nurse cells. Nutrients and developmental control molecules move from the nurse cells into the oocyte. In the figure to the left, the forming oocyte is covered by follicular support cells.

It was long thought that the characteristics of Drosophila flight were dominated by the viscosity of the air, rather than the inertia of the fly body. However, recent research by Michael Dickinson and Rosalyn Sayaman has indicated that flies perform banked turns, where the fly accelerates, slows down while turning, and accelerates again at the end of the turn. This indicates that inertia is the dominant force, as is the case with larger flying animals.

Adult flies are most active during warm, bright days and feed upon the surfaces of fruits, leaves, plant secretions and honeydew produced by aphids. During the preoviposition feeding stage, adult fruit flies spend time feeding on fruits, vegetables and other decaying materials.

A terrestrial biome. Savannas are grasslands with scattered individual trees that do not form a closed canopy. Extensive savannas are found in parts of subtropical and tropical Africa and South America, and in Australia.

The common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) measures 3 to 4 mm in length and is tan or light brown in color. Fruit flies have protruding eyes that are typically red, although some have darker eyes.

Drosophila, and probably many other flies, have optic nerves which lead directly to the wing muscles (while in other insects they always lead to the brain first), making it possible for them to react even more quickly than most insects.

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Drosophilidae is a diverse family of flies, including the genus Drosophila, which includes fruit flies, vinegar flies, wine flies, pomace flies, grape flies, and picked fruit-flies. The best known species is Drosophila melanogaster, which is used extensively for studies concerning genetics, development, physiology, ecology and behavior.

The wings of a fly are capable of beating at up to 220 times per second. Flies fly via straight sequences of movement interspersed by rapid turns called saccades. During these turns, a fly is able to rotate 90 degrees in fewer than 50 milliseconds.

Drosophila genes are traditionally named after the phenotype they cause when mutated. For example, the absence of a particular gene in Drosophila will result in a mutant embryo that does not develop a heart. Scientists have thus called this gene tinman, named after the Oz character of the same name.[27] This system of nomenclature results in a wider range of gene names than in other organisms.

Calcium binds to proteins such as calmodulin (CaM) and an eye-specific protein kinase C (PKC) known as InaC. These proteins interact with other proteins and have been shown to be necessary for turning off the light response. In addition, proteins called arrestins bind metarhodopsin and prevent it from activating more Gq.

As is implied by their name, fruit flies most commonly feed on fruit and other sugary substances. Fruit flies are also attracted to the fermenting sugars present in spilled alcoholic beverages. They are particularly fond of bananas and tend to infest homes with fruit left out on counters and other open surfaces.

Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most studied organism in biological research, particularly in genetics and developmental biology. There are several reasons:

The compound eye of the fruit fly contains 760 unit eyes or ommatidia, and are one of the most advanced among insects. Each ommatidium contains eight photoreceptor cells (R1-8), support cells, pigment cells, and a cornea. Wild-type flies have reddish pigment cells, which serve to absorb excess blue light so the fly is not blinded by ambient light.

reproduction in which eggs are released by the female; development of offspring occurs outside the mother's body.

If there is no fruit or vegetable matter in your kitchen, check your garbage and recycling bins. Fruit flies may also use unclean drains as breeding grounds. Outdoor drains are likely sources of yard-based fruit flies, as are overripe fruits beneath the trees from which they have fallen.

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Genetic markers are commonly used in Drosophila research, for example within balancer chromosomes or P-element inserts, and most phenotypes are easily identifiable either with the naked eye or under a microscope. In the list of example common markers below, the allele symbol is followed by the name of the gene affected and a description of its phenotype. (Note: Recessive alleles are in lower case, while dominant alleles are capitalised.)

An animal that eats mainly plants or parts of plants.

islands that are not part of continental shelf areas, they are not, and have never been, connected to a continental land mass, most typically these are volcanic islands.

Common Fruit Fly

reproduction that includes combining the genetic contribution of two individuals, a male and a female

Drosophila is a genus of small flies whose members are often called small fruit flies, or more appropriately vinegar flies, wine flies, pomace flies, grape flies, and picked fruit-flies. The terms "fruit fly" and "Drosophila" are often used synonymously with Drosophila melanogaster in modern biological literature. The entire genus, however, contains about 1,500 species and is very diverse in appearance, behavior, and breeding habitat.

Drosophila melanogaster is a species of small fly. Adults are 3 to 4 mm long, may have red eyes, though some are dark eyed, and a tan thorax. The abdomen is black on top, gray underneath. Fruit flies can appear to be brown or tan in color.

forest biomes are dominated by trees, otherwise forest biomes can vary widely in amount of precipitation and seasonality.

living in residential areas on the outskirts of large cities or towns.

Approximately two-thirds of the Drosophila brain (about 200,000 neurons total) is dedicated to visual processing. Although the spatial resolution of their vision is significantly worse than that of humans, their temporal resolution is approximately ten times better.

Nuclear division in the early Drosophila embryo happens so quickly that there are no proper checkpoints, and as a result DNA is easily damaged. When the DNA is damaged, the nuclei containing damaged DNA detach from their centrosomes (which are responsible for mitotic spindle formation) and fall into the center of the yolk sac. Because this section does come to not form part of the fly, the DNA damage does not cause problems for the developing individual.

About two-thirds of the Drosophila brain is dedicated to visual processing.[43] Although the spatial resolution of their vision is significantly worse than that of humans, their temporal resolution is around 10 times better.