Free entry for up to six children accompanied by an adult member (under 19 years and within the family group).

Treknow is the largest of the other settlements in the parish, which include Trethevy, Trebarwith, Tregatta, Trenale and Trewarmett.

In Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae (c. 1136), Gorlois, Duke of Cornwall, puts his wife Igraine in Tintagol while he's at war (posuit eam in oppido Tintagol in littore maris: "he put her in the oppidum Tintagol on the shore of the sea"). Merlin disguised Uther Pendragon as Gorlois so that Uther could enter Tintagel and impregnate Igraine while pretending to be Gorlois. Uther and Igraine's child was King Arthur.

Excavations on the island's eastern side confirm that the rectangular huts, great ditch and imported pottery date from the 5th and 6th centuries.

In the early days of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds Charles Hambly (also known for saving shipwrecked sailors) was a correspondent for the Society. A hundred years later Harry Sandercock observed that even modern agricultural changes had not reduced the bird populations.[55]

The Tintagel Orpheus Male Voice Choir was founded in 1926 by Jack Thomas, a Welshman who worked at Trevillet Quarry. The choir has rehearsed weekly, and performed frequently, ever since.[64][65]

The site seems to have been abandoned for over 500 years.

Find out more about the history of Tintagel

The turquoise green water around this coast is caused by the slate/sand around Tintagel which contains elements of copper: strong sunlight turns the water a light turquoise green colour in warm weather. The rocks contain various metal ores in small amounts: a few of these were mined in the Victorian period.[47]

The borough of Bossiney was given the right to send two MPs to Parliament c. 1552 and continued to do so until 1832 when its status as a borough was abolished. The villages of Trevena and Bossiney were until the early 20th century separated by fields along Bossiney Road.

The village and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with the legends surrounding King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. The village has, in recent times, become attractive to day-trippers and tourists, and is one of the most-visited places in Britain.[5]

The site is largely deserted, despite a survey recommending that the headland be strengthened against possible foreign landings.

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These include the Old Post Office, Trevena (see above) and fine stretches of the cliffs along the coast including Glebe Cliff, Barras Nose and Penhallick Point. The coastal footpaths include part of the South West Coast Path.

Immerse yourself in history, myths and stunning scenery at Tintagel, a place inextricably linked with the legend of King Arthur. For centuries this dramatic castle and coastline has fired the imaginations of writers, artists and even the brother of a king. Now it's your turn to be inspired.

Finds of pottery, early coins and two Roman inscribed pillars suggest activity on the headland.

Tintagel is also used as a locus for the Arthurian mythos by the poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson in the poem Idylls of the King.

For the purposes of local government Tintagel is a civil parish and councillors are elected every four years. The principal local authority in this area is Cornwall Council, but until March 2009 the parish was in the area of North Cornwall District Council. Parish council minutes can be found on Tintagel Web. From 1894 to 1974 the parish was in the Camelford Rural District.

Will Tintagel Castle open during the week of Dec. 28-31?

Archaeologists have unearthed walls about 1m (3ft) thick at Tintagel Castle in Cornwall in the first excavation of a five-year English Heritage project.

Discoveries at the site also include large amounts of pottery from the eastern Mediterranean used for olive oil and wine, as well as Merovingian glass and fine Phocaean tableware from the west coast of Turkey.

King Arthur's Hall at Trevena is a substantial building of the early 1930s.[30] It was built for custard powder manufacturer F. T. Glasscock as the headquarters of the "Fellowship of the Knights of the Round Table", behind Trevena House. A variety of Cornish stones are used in the construction and the 73 stained glass windows illustrating the Arthurian tales are by Veronica Whall; there are several paintings of scenes from the life of King Arthur by William Hatherell.[31][32]

Geoffrey of Monmouth writes his History of the Kings of Britain. His legendary King Arthur is conceived at Tintagel by Uther Pendragon and Igerna, wife of Duke Gorlois of Cornwall.

In the town itself, the Old Post Office is originally a fourteenth century manor house with a topsy-turvy slate roof, recently restored and now one of the National Trust’s most attractive small buildings. In addition, there is a Roman milestone from around 250AD in the parish church.

In 1991 a local bird keeper, Jon Hadwick, published Owl Light about his experiences keeping ten owls and a buzzard.[53][54]

Near Dunderhole Point on Glebe Cliff stands a building from the former slate quarry: this has been used as Tintagel Youth Hostel (managed by YHA) for many years.

Live and breathe the story of England at royal castles, historic gardens, forts & defences, world-famous prehistoric sites and many others.

Set high on the rugged North Cornwall coast, Tintagel has dramatic sea views both from the castle ruins on the headland and island. This is a spectacular place, steeped in myths and mystery, and has inspired artists and writers throughout history who have associated it with the legend of King Arthur.

An oft-quoted Celtic etymology in the Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names,[8] accepts the view of Padel (1985) that the name is from Cornish *din meaning fort and *tagell meaning neck, throat, constriction, narrow (Celtic *dūn, "fort" = Irish dún, "fort", cf. Welsh dinas, "city"; *tagell = Welsh tagell, "gill, wattle").

The Ravenna Cosmography, of around 700, makes reference to Purocoronavis, (almost certainly a corruption of Durocornovium), 'a fort or walled settlement of the Cornovii': the location is unidentified, but Tintagel and Carn Brea have both been suggested. (If this is correct then it would have been on the site of Tintagel Castle.)

Mr Scutt said the richness of the discoveries made Tintagel "one of the most important sites in western Europe".

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An area of the churchyard was excavated in 1990–91 by the Cornwall Archaeological Unit.[42][43] The parish war memorial stands at the western end of the churchyard and a modern churchyard cross (c. 1910) near the south entrance.

Tintagel

Tintagel was the venue for the Gorsedh Kernow in 1964.

Some of the buildings had been excavated in the 1930s by the British archaeologist Ralegh Radford who had thought they formed part of a monastery, Mr Scutt said.

Toponymists have had difficulty explaining the origin of 'Tintagel': the probability is that it is Norman French as the Cornish of the 13th century would have lacked the soft 'g' ('i/j' in the earliest forms: see also Tintagel Castle). If it is Cornish then 'Dun' would mean Fort. Oliver Padel proposes 'Dun' '-tagell' meaning narrow place in his book on place names.[6] There is a possible cognate in the Channel Islands named Tente d'Agel, but that still leaves the question subject to doubt.[7]

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"We haven't found any others, so it's quite possible that this was the centre, and maybe they were static."

This brooding 13th-century castle sits on the rugged and spectacular...

References to King Arthur's Castle become a tangled mixture of local folklore and literary legends.