Welcome to the Family run Albright Hussey Manor Hotel and Restaurant. Set in 4 acres of beautiful landscaped gardens and surrounded by an original moat.

Almost an island, caught in a loop of the river Severn, the town of Shrewsburyinspired the poet Housman to write in 'A Shropshire Lad'

Situated on the Wyle Cop this historic boutique town househotel offers stylish accommodation and delicious local seasonal food.  Single supplement from £75 per night.

You also find a huge variety of things to see and do in the surrounding Shropshire countryside. Try our Town Tour here or see our Attractions Listings here.

In an average year, the warmest day is 28.4 °C (83.1 °F),[41] giving a total of 8.9 days[42] of 25.1 °C (77.2 °F) or above. The absolute maximum of 34.9 °C (94.8 °F)[43] was recorded in August 1990.

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To search for shopping establishments, in Shrewsbury and the rest of Shropshire, please click here.

Home Farm, Attingham - a short walk from the Hall is this working farm with plenty to discover about real farming. Hands on activities, small animals and rare breeds.

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Three Cottages set in open countryside with far reaching scenic views offer accommodation for up to 18 guests (4/7/7) for Short Breaks, Weekly and Longer Stays.

Continuing on the floral theme, due to the proliferation of plants and blooms, particularly in the summer months, Shrewsbury is often referred to as the "Town of Flowers".

Shrewsbury Museum and Art Gallery - special exhibitions of Contemporary art - recent shows include part of the Saatchi collection and Antony Gormley's Field for the British Isles.

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Let us show you the town of Shrewsbury...

Post-16 education is handled by Shrewsbury Sixth Form College, previously the Priory School for Boys[127] recently ranked 17th in the top 20 of sixth form colleges nationally by the Sunday Times newspaper and Shrewsbury College of Arts and Technology, which handles primarily vocational courses.

There are several Anglican churches in Shrewsbury.[89] Methodists,[90] Baptists[91] and the United Reformed Church are also represented, alongside newer church groups including Elim Pentecostal[92] and Newfrontiers.[93][94] Shrewsbury Evangelical Church meets in the former Anglican parish church of St Julian at the Wyle Cop end of Fish Street.[95] Shrewsbury's first non-Christian place of worship, a Muslim centre, was approved in 2013.[96]

For more than half a century The Swingles have pushed the boundaries of vocal music. The seven young singers that make up today’s London-based group are driven by the same innovative spirit that has defined the five-time Grammy® winners since they first made waves in the 1960s. With two new albums in 2015 (Deep End and Yule Songs vol.II), The Swingles celebrate that legacy by starting a whole new chapter.

What a year 2016 was! Fun, sun, the best music and dance and a fabulous vibe – what more could you want? We’re already working on the 2017 festival and while we can’t divulge any details yet, you can rest assured we will bring you some of most established artists from the UK alongside acts celebrating folk traditions from across the world. They’ll take you on a voyage of discovery, bringing you ever-changing musical colours with their breath-taking performances.

Bread, still warm, made with flour from a watermill a few miles away in the Shropshire countryside. Decadent dining in restaurant rooms that pre-date the Wars of the Roses.

The town is the location of the town and county councils, and a number of retail complexes, both in and out of the town centre, and these provide significant employment. Four in five jobs in the town are in the service industry. Within this sector, the largest employers are the administration and distribution sectors, which includes retail, food and accommodation.[58]

Once the fourth largest city in Roman Britain, visitors to Wroxeter today can take a tour around the fascinating ruins, and explore the new Roman Town House, constructed as part of Channel 4’s ‘Rome Wasn’t Built in a Day’.

The main railway station building includes a clock tower, imitation Tudor chimneys and carved heads in the frames of every window. There is a small British Transport Police station within the building.

 We will be running a Supporters' Coach from Shrewsbury to Cambridge, which will depart from the Alington Hall at 1.30pm. Places are free but strictly limited. Please contact Nikki Bevan (nbevan@shrewsbury.org.uk) if you would like to come to the Evensong or to book a place on the coach.

Shrewsbury is full of finds to be discovered during your visit – a blockbuster in a Tudor cinema, a sell-out Folk Festival and the world’s oldest Flower Show. By foot or by boat, the River Severn is a must, as is the café culture, the castle and the churches that dominate Shrewsbury's famous skyline. Learn more about one-off attractions, activities and things to do in Shrewsbury and Shropshire.

Sixteen generations of the Ashton family have cherished this ancient Shropshire manor house, set in 500 acres of private country estate and woodland as John and Ann Ashton and family do today.

Wroxeter Roman City - earlier even than Shrewsbury itself. The ruins of the fourth largest city in Roman Britain. English Heritage have thoughtfully provided an audio tour and exhibition on site to tell you all about it.

Shrewsbury, Shropshire's county town, founded by the Saxons and most extensively developed by Tudors, lies within a giant loop of the river Severn and is famed for its castle, spires, abbey, parklands and half-timbered medieval houses.

Whether you are interested in fine china, fun interactives or a 'Victorian' town, its all to be found in this World Heritage Site.

In film Shrewsbury was used as the setting for the popular 1984 film, A Christmas Carol,[113] which filmed many of its interior and exterior shots in and around the town. The gravestone prop of Ebenezer Scrooge (played by George C. Scott) that was used in the movie is still present in the graveyard of St Chad's Church.

The A458 (Welshpool-Bridgnorth) runs through the town centre, entering in the west and leaving to the southeast. The A528 begins in the town centre and heads north, heading for Ellesmere. The A488 begins just west of the town centre in Frankwell and heads out to Bishop's Castle, Clun and Knighton crossing the border in the southwest of Shropshire.

Shrewsbury

The Choir is in very fine form at the moment under its Director, Mr Alex Mason, and and numbers have blossomed since the recent introduction of full co-education. In the past two years the Choir has sung at Southwell Minster, Tewkesbury Abbey, The Queen’s College, Oxford and Manchester Cathedral.

There are endless boutiques and quirky independents, all tucked away in 'shuts and passages' (those crooked medieval alleyways that criss-cross the town centre).

Shrewsbury is full of higgledy-piggledy streets with names you want to say out loud. A river that scoops up the town in a loop. A mix of the very old and the very new. The quirky and the one-off. Here’s where you can find information to plan your visit to Shrewsbury.

The surroundings are infested with Zeds, but The Dana Shrewsbury has become one stronghold it's now the SANCTUM. Inside;...

In 2009 a brand new online independent media company launched covering Shrewsbury and Shropshire. shropshirelive.com,[119] is based in Shrewsbury with local residents encouraged to get involved with the web site by becoming citizen journalists and contributors.

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According to the United Kingdom Census 2001, the population of the town of Shrewsbury was 67,126.[56] The same census put the population of the wider (and now abolished) borough of Shrewsbury and Atcham at 95,850.[56] In 1981 the population of the town was 57,731 and in 1991 the population of the town was 64,219.[57] Shrewsbury is Shropshire's second largest town, after Telford.

It was in the late Middle Ages (14th and 15th centuries) when the town was at its height of commercial importance. This was mainly due to the wool trade, a major industry at the time, with the rest of Britain and Europe, especially with the River Severn and Watling Street as trading routes.[16] The Shrewsbury Drapers Company dominated the trade in Welsh wool for many years.[17]

Whilst I am delighted to welcome you to Shrewsbury School's website, I hope you will not regard a trawl through our web pages as a substitute for a visit in person. 

Directly after the service, there will be a drinks reception in the Webb Library in college, hosted by the Headmaster number of senior school staff including the Director of Music, Mr John Moore. Parents, OS and friends of the School are warmly invited to attend.