Seasonal dog ban. Easter day to 1st October

Polzeath beach is patrolled by lifeguards during the summer and is described on the RNLI website as : ... a wide, flat beach with some shelter from winds, it sees good quality surf and is quite often extremely crowded.[3]

Both Daymer Bay and Trebetherick, with their fine bathing and surfing beaches, have a huge appeal to families. This is exhilarating and magnificent country, with wide open, peaceful spaces in which to be at one with nature. Within easy walking distance of the beach at Daymer is St Enodoc Church, which was once buried in the sand. This is where Sir John Betjeman is buried. Daymer Bay is popular with windsurfers and the rock pools also appeal to small children with buckets and spades.

There are many sports and leisure facilities in the area, including a couple of golf courses.

Polzeath is a small village situated on the North coast of Cornwall; it is home to a fantastic beach and village and is also one of the world’s most renowned surfing destinations.  Polzeath, is split into two parts – the old and the new, both overlooking a magnificent stretch of golden sand between Pentire Head to the north and Highcliff to the west.

RNLI lifeguard cover: Easter bank holiday, weekends during April, daily from 5 May to 30 September and weekends during October

In the first of Enid Blyton's Famous Five novels, the eponymous children express disappointment that their holiday will not, as usual, be spent at Polzeath.[11] The author Joolz Denby lived in a caravan in Polzeath for a year while researching her novel Borrowed Light, published in 2006.[citation needed]

Polzeath (/pəlˈzɛθ/) (Cornish: Polsegh, meaning dry creek) is a small seaside resort in the civil parish of St Minver[1] in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) north west of Wadebridge on the Atlantic coast.[2]

In 1911 a Methodist chapel was built on the road towards Trebetherick at Chapel Corner. The original building was demolished in 1932 when the village street was widened. A new village hall was opened on 15 April 1933.[5]

The main street runs along the seafront and has a parade of shops catering for holidaymakers and residents. There are pubs, cafés, restaurants, a caravan site and several camping sites in the immediate area. The road rises up steep hills at both ends of the seafront; towards the village of Trebetherick to the southwest and New Polzeath to the northeast.[2]

Polzeath was a favourite haunt of the poet laureate, Sir John Betjeman, and is celebrated in some of his verse.[10] Another poet, Laurence Binyon, wrote the Remembrance Day ode For the Fallen in 1914 while sitting on The Rumps, Polzeath or "Polseath" as it was called, during World War I.

Dolphins may sometimes be spotted in the bay and the coastline north of Polzeath is a good area for seeing many types of birds including corn buntings and puffins.[4]

It was a favourite haunt of the late poet laureate, Sir John Betjeman and is celebrated in some of his verse.  There are many local shops, providing everything required for the holidaymaker.  There are many local shops, providing everything required for the holidaymaker. Within the village are a number of pubs, cafés and restaurants. There are also several camping sites, one that caters specifically for families and another with clear sea views.

Where to stay in Polzeath  Things to do in PolzeathMap of Polzeath

Polzeath is a haven for surfers and beach lovers alike. There are lifeguards on the beach during the daytime in the summer season. Although generally a safe beach, there can be large surf with rips and care should be taken at all times. There is a sand and shingle beach, situated at the mouth of a river and backed by interesting cliffs.  

Consistent, slow, intermediate-friendly walls, spread along the beach plus to the north, a reasonable right breaks off Pentire Point at size. Consistent and crowded at this popular holiday spot. Full facilities.

Polzeath is a small village situated on the North coast of Cornwall, home to a fantastic beach and one of the world’s most renowned surfing destinations. The beach is a magnificent stretch of golden sand between Pentire Head to the north and Highcliff to the west. It was a favourite haunt of the late Poet Laureate, Sir John Betjeman, and is celebrated in some of his verse. 

Polzeath has a sandy beach and is popular with holiday-makers and surfers. The beach is 1,500 feet (460 m) wide and extends 1,200 feet (370 m) from the seafront at low water; however, most of the sand is submerged at high water.[2] At exceptionally high spring tides the sea floods the car park at the top of the beach.

The cartoonist Posy Simmonds created a fictitious place in Cornwall called "Tresoddit". When the BBC made the short film Tresoddit for Easter in 1991, it was filmed in and around Polzeath.

The coastal footpath between Polzeath and St Enodoc is suitable for wheelchair users, offering an opportunity for all to appreciate the stunning scenery of the estuary.

The winter storms of 2014 changed the topography of the beach and there is now a sand bar across the beach.[6][7]

As would be expected of a Blue Flag beach there is good disabled access and facilities. Sand chairs are currently unavailable

A stream rises near St Minver 2 miles (3.2 km) to the south. Before reaching Polzeath, it is joined by a tributary which rises north of Pityme. Shilla Mill at the edge of Polzeath, stands at the confluence of the streams.[2] Built around 1590 it ceased working as a mill in 1885 and was converted into a house.

Polzeath is a small village on the headland opposite Padstow. It was a favourite haunt place of the late poet laureate, Sir John Betjeman and is celebrated in some of his verse. There are many local shops, providing everything required for the holidaymaker. Within the village are a number of pubs, cafés and restaurants.

Polzeath

Until 1934 the main street through the village crossed the stream by means of a ford. A footbridge was provided for pedestrians which was sometimes washed away by winter storms. In 1934 the road bridge was built.

There are several car parks in the vicinity of the beach, including the beach itself. Owing to the popularity of Polzeath these can fill up relatively quickly in the summer months.

Tourism developed in the 19th and 20th centuries to be the most significant part of the local economy.[8] UK Prime minister David Cameron and his wife holidayed there from 2010 to 2015.[9]