Seagulls are found throughout 1066 Country, but most particularly in coastal towns. They are clever birds and figure out very quickly where the best food and nesting opportunities are, and can become a nuisance around businesses (especially cafes with outdoor seating!) and public areas.  Please keep Hastings clear of rubbish that might create a food source for seagulls, and please do not feed them.

Hastings was shown as a borough by the time of the Domesday Book (1086); it had also given its name to the Rape of Hastings, one of the six administrative divisions of Sussex. As a borough, Hastings had a corporation consisting of a "bailiff, jurats, and commonalty". By a Charter of Elizabeth I in 1589, the bailiff was replaced by a mayor.

As established General Practice Solicitors we are able to advise on all the usual legal matters to provide peace of mind for yourself and your family.

William caused a castle to be built at Hastings probably using the earthworks of the existing Saxon castle.

Every year the Hastings Half Marathon is held in the town. The 13.1 mi (21.1 km) race first took place in 1984 and attracts entrants from all over the country, taking runners on a route encircling the town, starting and finishing by the West Marina Gardens in St Leonards.

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The Saxon Shore Way, (a long distance footpath, 163 mi (262 km) in length from Gravesend, Kent traces the Kent and Sussex coast "as it was in Roman times" to Hastings. The National Cycle Network route NCR2 links Dover to St Austell along the south coast, and passes through Hastings.

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If you need to make a claim on your car, van or bike insurance, call our helpline on 0800 035 4260 as soon as possible.

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Hastings has 18 primary schools, four secondary schools, one further education college and one higher education institution.

There are many bowling greens in the parks and gardens located about the town; the Hastings Open Bowls Tournament has been held annually in June since 1911 and attracts many entrants country-wide.[49]

Where should I eat?The Rock-a-Nore Kitchen is particularly adept when it comes to calamari and Dover sole (lunch from £8.50). Elsewhere, beautiful homeware store Hendy’s hosts pop-up dinners.

Hastings & St Leonards/Hastings Downs Golf Club (now defunct) was founded in 1893. The club disappeared in the 1950s.[50]

Many church buildings throughout the town are Grade II listed including; Church in the Wood, Ebenezer Particular Baptist Chapel, Fishermen's Museum and St Mary Magdalene's Church.

Hastings Conquerors is the town's only American Football Club. The club was founded in March 2013 by local resident Chris Chillingworth and currently trains at William Parker Sports College. The club made history in June 2013 when it became the UK's first Co-Operative run not-for-profit American Football club.

Historically, Hastings can claim fame from the Battle of Hastings, and later because it became one of the medieval Cinque Ports. Hastings was, for centuries, an important fishing port; although nowadays less important, it still has the largest beach-based fishing fleet in Europe. The town became a popular spot for 'taking the waters' (therapeutic bathing in the sea) in the 1760s, and then, with the coming of the railway, a seaside resort.

In the Middle Ages Hastings became one of the Cinque Ports; Sandwich, Dover and New Romney being the first, Hastings and Hythe followed, all finally being joined by Rye and Winchelsea, at one point 42 towns were directly or indirectly affiliated with the group.

The town is served by Stagecoach buses on routes that serve the town, and also extend to Bexhill, Eastbourne and Dover as part of The Wave route. Stagecoach also run long distance buses up to Northiam, Hawkhurst, Royal Tunbridge Wells, Ashford and Canterbury. Metrobus run service 290 from Beauport Park to Gatwick Airport twice a day in the early morning.

Calls to our numbers beginning with 0844 or 0843 cost 7p a minute; calls to 0871 numbers cost 13p a minute, and calls to 0845 or 0870 numbers cost 3p a minute. Your phone company will also charge you a fixed access fee when you make a call to any of these numbers. Please contact your phone company for their call access charges. Calls to 0800 or 0808 numbers are now free from mobiles as well as landlines. Calls may be recorded for our mutual protection.

Sussex Coast College, formerly called Hastings College, is the town's further education college; it is located at Station Plaza, next to the railway station.

Hastings, it is thought, was a Saxon town before the arrival of the Normans: the Domesday Book refers to a new Borough: as a borough, Hastings had a corporation consisting of a "bailiff, jurats, and commonalty".[8] Its importance was such that it also gave its name to one of the six Rapes or administrative districts of Sussex.

The Hastings Miniature Railway operates along the beach from Rock-a-Nore to Marine Parade, and has provided tourist transport since 1948. The railway was considerably restored and re-opened in 2010.

Between 1903 and 1919 Fred Judge FRPS photographed many of the towns events and disasters. These included storms, the first tram, visit of the Lord Mayor of London, Hastings Marathon Race and the pier fire of 1917. Many of these images were produced as picture postcards by the British Postcard manufacturer he founded now known as Judges Postcards.

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Why Hastings?Move over Brighton … With a new cookery school, artisan shops, gourmet food and modern art, the Sussex seaside town has gone cool. And this summer its pier, in the final stages of a £14m renovation, will add film festivals and farmers’ markets to the mix.

There are three museums in Hastings; the Hastings Museum and Art Gallery, the Hastings Fishermen's Museum and the Shipwreck Museum. The former two mentioned are open for the whole year while the Shipwreck Museum is open only weekends during the winter, but daily for the rest of the year.

Hastings is served by two rail companies: Southeastern and Southern. Southeastern services run along the Hastings Line, generally terminating at Hastings, with some peak services extending to Ore; the other lines are served by Southern, with services terminating at Ore or Ashford.

Hastings

Hastings Insurance Services Limited, trading as Hastings Direct, is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (register number 311492). Registered Office: Conquest House, Collington Avenue, Bexhill-on-Sea, East Sussex, TN39 3LW. Registered in England and Wales no. 3116518. All policies are subject to English Law.

Hastings Castle was built in 1070 by the Normans, four years after the Norman invasion. It is located on the West Hill, overlooking the town centre and is a Grade I listed building. Little remains of the castle apart from the arch left from the chapel, part of the walls and dungeons. The nearby St. Clements Caves are home to the Smugglers Adventure, which features interactive displays relating to the history of smuggling on the south coast of England.

A local metro railway service from Bexhill to Ore has also been proposed.[43]

The Hastings Museum and Art gallery concentrates mostly on local history and contains exhibits on Grey Owl and John Logie Baird. It also features a Durbar Hall, donated by Lord Brassey; the hall contains displays focusing on the Indian subcontinent and the Brassey Family. The Fishermen's Museum, housed in the former fishermen's church, is dedicated to the fishing industry and maritime history of Hastings. The Shipwreck Museum displays artifacts from wrecks around the area.

During the reign of Athelstan, he established a royal mint in Hastings in AD 928.[14]

There are plans to expand the retail area in Hastings, which includes expanding Priory Meadow and creating more retail space as part of the Priory Quarter development. Priory was intended to have a second floor added to part of the retail area, which has not happened yet and so far only office space has been created as part of the Priory Quarter.[31]

Today, nestling between the East and West Hills, the Old Town is a charming mix of half-timbered houses, narrow streets and passageways, locally known as ‘twittens’. Both the Shipwreck Museum and the Fishermens Museum vividly recall old seafaring days and famous local sunken ships. Next to the museums are the impressive tall black Net Huts, Hastings Fish Market offering fresh fish caught in an environmentally friendly way, fish stalls, seafood restaurants and cafes.

There are two theatres in the town, the White Rock Theatre and the Stables Theatre. The White Rock theatre is the venue of the yearly pantomime and throughout the year hosts comedy, dance and music acts. The Stables stages more local productions and acts as an arts exhibition centre. The Phoenix Arts Centre, based at Ark William Parker Academy also stages local productions as well as shows put on by the school.

The sandstone cliffs have been the subject of considerable erosion in relatively recent times: much of the Castle was lost to the sea before the present sea defences and promenade were built, and a number of cliff-top houses are in danger of disappearing around the nearby village of Fairlight.

So what can I do?A day out in Hastings once meant crazy golf and funiculars. While those options remain, visitors can now take seafood cookery lessons at Classroom on the Coast or take in the jet-black Jerwood Gallery, where Beside The Seaside, an exhibition by Chantal Joffe, is showing until 12 April.

In the 13th century, much of the town and half of Hastings Castle was washed away in the South England flood of February 1287. During a naval campaign of 1339, and again in 1377, the town was raided and burnt by the French, and seems then to have gone into a decline. As a port, Hastings' days were finished.