The name Harrogate is first attested in the 1330s as Harwegate, Harougat and Harrowgate. The origin of the name is uncertain. It may derive from Old Norse hǫrgr 'a heap of stones, cairn' + gata 'street', in which case the name presumably meant 'road to the cairn'.[9] Another possibility is that the name means "the way to Harlow". The form Harlowgate is known from 1518,[10] and apparently in the court rolls of Edward II.[11]

Buses are every 15 minutes between Harrogate, Ripon and Leeds (via Harewood, Moortown and Chapel Allerton) on route 36, which run more frequently at peak time and overnight on Fridays and Saturdays between Leeds and Harrogate. The 770 route runs to Leeds via Wetherby, Boston Spa and Seacroft as well as other parts of semi-rural Leeds. There are services to Otley, Bradford, Knaresborough and Pateley Bridge.

H.P. Lovecraft's At The Mountains of Madness

Whether you love the great outdoors or prefer shopping and good food, whether your passion is for gardens, history, art, culture or theatre, whether you want white knuckle rides or a leisurely round of golf, we have it all and more besides.  With so much to enjoy, it is easy to see why the area was voted the happiest place in Britain for two years running!

The Royal Pump Room houses Europe's strongest sulphur well,[33] but is now a museum showcasing the town's spa history.

In 1893 Harrogate doctor George Oliver was the first to observe the effect of adrenaline on the circulation.

With a Cathedral City, a Spa town, historic market towns, a World Heritage Site and an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty all within a few short miles of each other, the Harrogate district provides the perfect base for a varied holiday.

The nearest airport is Leeds Bradford International Airport, 10 miles (16 km) to the south-west, to which there are bus services on route 747, and train services on the Harrogate Line to Horsforth station, one of the closest stations. Manchester Airport is accessible by rail via Leeds railway station.

The former railway lines to Ripon and Wetherby (see Wetherby railway station) were dismantled in the 1960s. A prospective railway company, First Harrogate Trains, proposed to run trains from London King's Cross to Harrogate,[41] but failed to get approval in a process that ended in February 2009.

RHS Harlow Carr gardens, on the western edge of Harrogate, are award-winning themed gardens and are the Royal Horticultural Society's main presence and representative in the North of England.

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Harrogate's main shopping district is focused on Cambridge Street, Oxford Street, Beulah Street and James Street where most of the high street shops can be found. There is a wide range of boutique and designer shopping on Parliament Street and in the Montpellier Quarter, as well as independent shopping around Commercial Street.

The Mercer Art Gallery[35] is home to Harrogate district's art collection which consists of some 2,000 works of art, mainly from the 19th and 20th centuries. The collection includes works by William Powell Frith, Atkinson Grimshaw, Sir Edward Burne-Jones, Dame Laura Knight and Alan Davie.

The town hosted the 1982 Eurovision Song Contest in the conference centre.

In the 17th and 18th centuries further chalybeate springs were discovered in High Harrogate, and both chalybeate and sulphur springs were found in Low Harrogate. The two communities attracted many visitors. A number of inns were opened for visitors in High Harrogate in the 17th century (the Queen's Head, the Granby, the Dragon and the World's End.) In Low Harrogate the Crown was open by the mid 18th century, and possibly earlier.[13][14]

Harrogate Linton-On-Ouse (HRT) is a military airfield located approximately 15 miles to the east in Linton-on-Ouse.

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Harrogate was popular among the English élite and frequented by nobility from mainland Europe[citation needed]. Its popularity declined after the First World War. During the Second World War, Harrogate's large hotels accommodated government offices evacuated from London paving the way for the town to become a commercial, conference, and exhibition centre.

Two military installations are located to the west of Harrogate, the Army Foundation College and RAF Menwith Hill, an electronic monitoring station.

In 2012, Harrogate had the highest concentration of drink drivers in the UK.[51] A March 2013 survey from the British property website Rightmove ranked Harrogate as the "happiest place" to live in the United Kingdom, an acclaim repeated in 2014 and 2015.[52] Harrogate District Hospital also has the best cancer care of any hospital in England.[53]

Harrogate is the home of Yorkshire Tea, exported by Taylors of Harrogate, as well as internationally exported Harrogate Spring Water. The town also exports Farrah's Toffee, Harrogate Blue cheese and Debbie & Andrews Harrogate sausages.

A hugely diverse range of accommodation options means you can stay in anything from five star luxury to a bunk barn.  Choose from smart town hotels, rural bed and breakfasts or a pub with rooms – and everything in between. 

Harrogate spa water contains iron, sulphur and common salt. The town became known as 'The English Spa' in the Georgian era, after its waters were discovered in the 16th century. In the 17th and 18th centuries its 'chalybeate' waters (containing iron) were a popular health treatment, and the influx of wealthy but sickly visitors contributed significantly to the wealth of the town.

For those that prefer self-catering there are a host of cottages, serviced apartments, caravan and campsites.  Whatever your budget, whatever your style, there is something here for you.

Harrogate is a spa town in North Yorkshire, England. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, the town is a tourist destination and its visitor attractions include its spa waters and RHS Harlow Carr gardens. Nearby is the Yorkshire Dales national park and the Nidderdale AONB. Harrogate grew out of two smaller settlements, High Harrogate and Low Harrogate, in the 17th century. Since 2013, polls have consistently voted the town as "the happiest place to live" in Britain.[1][2][3][4]

Harrogate

Former employers in the town were the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB), the Milk Marketing Board and ICI who occupied offices and laboratories at Hornbeam Park where Crimplene was invented in the 1950s and named after the nearby Crimple Valley and beck.

The town is a dormitory town for commuters working in Leeds and Bradford.[22][23] Harrogate is prosperous and has some of the highest property prices in England, with many properties in the town and surrounding villages valued at £1 million or more.[24]

Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is a dramatic landscape of contrasts which has been shaped over thousands of years by the people who have lived and worked here.

The Montpellier Quarter is the centre of the town's nightlife, which is mainly centred on the renovated Royal Baths development.

Eating out is popular in Harrogate, and the town well served by restaurants. Parliament Street and Cheltenham Parade are lined with many independent and chain restaurants, while there is a concentration of chain restaurants on John Street and Albert Street.

Discover walking tracks, cycle routes and bridlepaths in Nidderdale, Pateley Bridge, Ripon, Masham, Boroughbridge and the Yorkshire Dales.  Slip back to ancient times visiting monuments such as Ripon Cathedral, Fountains Abbey, our Turkish Baths or admire the 18th Century elegance of historic houses such as Newby Hall. 

The Great Yorkshire Showground is the hub of the regional agricultural industry, hosted by the Yorkshire Agricultural Society. The Great Yorkshire Show, Countryside Live and the twice yearly Harrogate Flower Shows take place there annually.

The many business visitors to Harrogate sustain a number of large hotels, some originally built for visitors to the Spa.

The town motto is Arx celebris fontibus, which means "a citadel famous for its springs."[8]

Media related to Harrogate, North Yorkshire at Wikimedia Commons

Crescent Gardens is a small open area in central Harrogate surrounded by some of the town's main tourist attractions including the Royal Pump Room, Royal Baths and Royal Hall, as well as the Town Hall. Hall M of the Harrogate International Centre fronts onto Crescent Gardens.

This unspoilt cathedral city is a North Yorkshire gem, balancing a rich cultural heritage with exciting contemporary living. With its imposing cathedral, fascinating museums and a bustling market square, there is plenty to entertain the visitor in Ripon. And skip just 10 miles in any direction and you'll discover a wealth of first class visitor attractions in the surrounding beautiful Dales countryside.

There are things to do, attractions and events for children of all ages whether riding on Britain’s longest roller coaster, hiring a boat on the river at Knaresborough, trekking with llamas or zip-wiring down gorges.

There is one daily weekday service to London King's Cross via Leeds operated by Virgin Trains East Coast, who have promised to increase this number to 6 by 2019.

Harrogate bus station is in the town centre. It is managed by Harrogate Bus Company, the main operator. [46] The 13 stands are also used by Connexionsbuses, [47] Yorkshire Tiger[48] and National Express.

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