Gargrave's football club currently has an A and a B team playing in the Premier Division and Division 1 of the Craven League.

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OPENING HOURSMonday-Sunday     12pm-12am

Since the turn of the century there is a golf society run from the Masons Arms public house in the village.

The cricket club has first and second team playing in the Craven and District Cricket League.

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Without question, Gargrave provides a fantastic base for those looking to spread their wings a little further afield, with the medieval Skipton Castle being a popular destination for history buffs. Visitors should also check out the Embsay and Bolton Abbey Steam Railway. Opened in 1888, the line runs over four miles from a station close to the 12th century ruins of Bolton Abbey through the villages of Draughton and Holywell before ending in Embsay.

Gargrave House was built in 1917 by the distinguished Scottish architect, James Dunn.

Being on the edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park and having the Pennine Way National Trail going through the village, Gargrave is a popular destination for hikers and cyclists. Gargrave has a village hall hosting art exhibitions, tea dances, snooker, lectures, indoor bowls and pantomimes.

Gargrave is in the Gargrave and Malhamdale ward of the non-unitary authority, Craven District Council, and is also served by the North Yorkshire County Council for local services. The population of this ward at the 2011 Census was measured at 3,037.[4] For parliamentary elections Gargrave is in the Skipton and Ripon constituency.

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Former Chancellor of the Exchequer Iain Macleod is buried in the south-east corner of the churchyard.

Transport to and from Gargrave is quite good despite its rural location. The village is located on the A65 which is made up by a number of bypasses linking Leeds with Kendle in Cumbria. It also has its own train station on the Leeds to Morecambe and Carlisle lines as well as regular bus services to and from Skipton, Barnoldswick, Settle and Preston.

The Leeds and Liverpool Canal passes through the village and the main road is the A65 Leeds to Kendal road. There has been a long-running campaign to have a by-pass built around the village. Gargrave railway station is served by rail services to Skipton and Leeds to the east and Morecambe and Carlisle to the west. Gargrave has bus links to Skipton, Settle, Malham, Barnoldswick and Preston.

Gargrave enjoyed further attention during the 1960s when the remains of a Roman Villa known as Kirk Sink were found in the village. The dig, which was led by a team from the Archaeology Department at the University of Leeds and The Friends of Craven Museum, uncovered the foundations of a property built between the second and fourth centuries.

At Kirk Sink in the second century the Romans built a villa in flat meadowland near the River Aire. It was excavated in 1968-1974 by Brian Hartley. Its central room had a seven-metre square mosaic floor and a bath house was built alongside. The villa was surrounded by two ditches.[3]

Gargrave is a large village and civil parish in the Craven district located along the A65, 4 miles (6 km) north-west of Skipton in North Yorkshire, England. It is situated on the very edge of the Yorkshire Dales. The River Aire and the Leeds and Liverpool Canal pass through the village. It had a population of 1,764 in 2001[1] reducing slightly to 1,755 at the 2011 census.[2]

Perhaps the first person to bring national notoriety to Gargrave was the poet Robert Story. Originally from Northumberland, he moving to the region in 1820 and penned some of his most famous works, including Craven Blossoms, Magic Fountain and The Outlaw, while looking out across the local scenery.

Welcome to Gargrave local what's on now page. YorkshireDales.co.uk is trying to invest in the local community by giving every village an outlet to show the world what we are doing locally. For this section we are looking for all sorts of local information. For example it might include the following but we are happy to list lots more -:

The village also sits on the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. Built between 1770 and 1816, the pass was once an imperative system for the movement of cargo between Yorkshire's mill towns and the docks on Merseyside. Today it provides and beautiful and tranquil place to walk.

Situated on the southern edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park lies the picturesque village of Gargrave. The area has been inhabited since the Roman era and visitors could be forgiven for thinking that they had been transported back to a bygone time.

With its oak-beamed ceilings, open fire, traditional cask ales and home made food, The Masons Arms is just the place to relax and unwind in the company of friendly locals.

A number of the artefacts recovered can be viewed at the Craven Museum and Gallery in the town of Skipton, which is approximately four miles south of Gargrave.

With a population of barely 1,700, the village is small and quaint, making it an ideal place for a relaxing break as well as an outdoor adventure. Much of its architecture is Victorian and is constructed using traditional Yorkshire stone. Despite its diminutive size, Gargrave is home to number of public houses, some of which double up as bed and breakfasts.

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Gargrave

The parish church is dedicated to St Andrew was built in 1852 but has much earlier origins. Robert of Newminster who was born in the parish in about 1100 was an early rector.[5]

Gargrave lies on the A65 trunk road, four miles north west of Skipton. One of the largest villages in the Craven District of North Yorkshire, it sits astride the river Aire, only seven miles from its source at Malham. Read more about where Gargrave is ...

Gargrave's main appeal is its proximity to some of the most stunning countryside in the whole of the British Isles. As mentioned, the Dales start at one end of the village, but the sights to the west are also awe-inspiring.

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There is also a snooker club and a bowling club in the village as well as the Craven Lawn Tennis Club being sited there.

Hikers and cyclists are common visitors to this part of North Yorkshire and it's easy to see why. The Pennine Way National Trail, which runs for 267 miles from Kirk Yetholm on the Scottish border to Edale in Peak District, cuts directly through Gargrave.

Pull up a chair. Eat, drink and be merry.

FOOD SERVEDMonday-Sunday     12pm-8:30pm

Take a look at the film of the Gargrave Coronation day parade. (Image from www.telegraph.co.uk)