Welcome to the Dursley Glos Web, created as a local history guide to the town of Dursley in Gloucestershire, England in which I now live. It also contains information about the surrounding area and its close neighbours, Cam and Uley.

Stroudwater Navigation from Saul Junction to Stroud. Thames and Severn Canal from Stroud...

The nearest railway station is at Cam and Dursley on the Bristol and Gloucester Railway, with trains run by First Great Western.

Dursley gained borough status in 1471 and lost it in 1886. From then until 1974 it was the administrative centre of Dursley Rural District (RDC). In 1974 the RDC became part of Stroud District.

Historically, other large factories based in the town included Mawdsley's, an electrical equipment manufacturer; Bymack's, an upholsterers; and the Bailey Newspaper Group, a newspaper printer, all of which have reduced or closed operations in recent years.

Visit England’s largest area of outstanding natural beauty with Rosehill Travel. See...

Cam & Dursley railway station has excellent rail links with Bristol and Gloucester and a connecting bus service to Dursley centre. Accommodation in Dursley ranges from B&Bs to pubs and hotels.

Dursley is a market town and civil parish in Gloucestershire, England. It is under the northeast flank of Stinchcombe Hill, and about 3¾ miles (6 km) southeast of the River Severn. The town is adjacent to Cam which, though a village, is a community in its own right.

Surrounded by hills, and sitting on the Cotswold Way in the south Cotswolds, the market town of Dursley offers lovely walks with breathtaking views and is a great base for walkers. Dursley has Walkers are Welcome status and hosts its own Walking Festival every October. The Lantern Way is a new 14-mile circular walk taking in Dursley and the villages of Coaley and Uley.

The present is not forgotten though and I have included many photographs from recent times as well as a comprehensive 1000+ image virtual tour of the town in which you will be able to navigate your way around any of its streets with the click of a mouse. This photo tour was completed in 2003 as a snapshot of the town - consequently several areas of town have changed subsequently.

In 1856 a short branch line railway opened,[2] called the "Dursley Donkey" by locals, linking Dursley and Cam to the Bristol – Gloucester main line at Coaley Junction. The branch line was closed in 1968. Coaley Junction railway station was also closed at about this time. However, in 1994 a new railway station called Cam and Dursley was opened on the main line, 330 yards north of the site of Coaley Junction.

We serve a traditional Sunday Roast with a choice or meats, seasonal vegetables, either cauliflower cheese or cheesy leeks, roast potatoes, yorkshire pudding & gravy . There is always a vegetarian dish available too. Though we don’t have a childrens menu we serve a “half size, half price” meal. Choice of home-made puddings to follow. Sunday Main £12 – Puddings £5.25. Food served from 12-4pm, booking advisable

The town sits on the edge of the Cotswolds escarpment where it drops off towards the Severn Vale and the River Severn. It is adjacent with Cam which, though a village, is a community of double the size. The two communities (combined population about 12,000) share many facilities.

The town itself is located in a wooded valley under the Cotswold escarpment. At the heart of Dursley is the delightful 18th century market house, which is also the Town Hall. A variety of small shops, cafes and pubs in Dursley includes the award-winning Old Spot pub, and a bustling farmer’s market on the second Saturday of every month.

There can be no better atmosphere in which to enjoy a pint or two of the many cask ales always available and the humming of convivial conversation!

Dursley's own Heritage Centre aims to provide a door on to its past for residents and visitors alike. It can be found next to Jacob's House, now fully restored, and is centrally positioned near the Methodist Church and the Market House.

The town has long been associated with the Seymour family, having been home to Sheriff Sir John Seymour in the 15th century and the 18th century politician Henry Seymour And is now the Home of Howard Jeans-Seymour 10th Great Grandson to Sheriff Sir John Seymour (died 1491).

The Old Spot Inn – nestled at the foot of Stinchcombe Hill, in the Gloucestershire town of Dursley, you can find this award winning “gem” of a traditional hostelry. Situated on the Cotswold Way and surrounded by the glorious Cotswold countryside: the original building dates from 1776 and has low ceilings and comfortable connecting bar-rooms which are adorned with interesting “breweriana” from times gone by.

An electoral ward in the same name exists. The population and area of this ward are identical to that of the parish.

Berkeley Castle is unique; it has been lived in by the same family for almost 900 years,...

The countryside around Dursley provides plenty of scenic walks including the footpaths over Stinchcombe Hill, Cam Peak and Cam Long Down, with extensive panoramic views over the River Severn and beyond. The golf course on Stinchcombe Hill has been described as one of the most scenic in Europe.

Highgrove is the private home of Their Royal Highnesses The Prince of Wales and The...

The Bird and Deer Park is situated in a beautiful Cotswold valley offering wonderful...

The pillared market house, complete with statue of Queen Anne and bell turret, dates from 1738, when the town's markets attracted farmers and traders from miles around. It is now maintained by the Dursley Town Trust who also look after Jacob's House and the Heritage Centre.[1]

Newark Park stands proud on top of the Cotswold Escarpment, looking down into the...

New Brewery Arts is the home of craft and making in the heart of the Cotswolds, with...

Discover the treasures of the Cotswolds as you explore its history at this Award Winning...

Planning on visiting the amazing Westonbirt Arboretum?...If so, click here to get the...

We have a set menu available 12-3 daily with a specials board also available made with the freshest local ingredients available. We also serve a Sunday roast in sittings of 12-2 and 2-4, with a choice of 3 meats available as well as vegetarian and fish options!

Other things to do in Dursley include a visit to nearby Uley Bury is one of the finest examples of a promontory fort in Britain. Close by is Hetty Pegler’s Tump, a communal burial mound dating back to the Neolithic period. Twinberrow Woods is home to the Dursley Sculpture & Play Trail, featuring unique works by local groups and artists.

We are a friendly, growing Christian family, worshipping together, encouraging one another and endeavouring to proclaim the Gospel in our community and all the places in which we live, learn, work and play.         

Looking back over the last few years, Dursley has seen dramatic changes to its landscape and facilities - a brand new, state of the art Secondary School, new library, new fire station and numerous new housing developments around town. It's not over yet though and the town centre is continuing to change as we look forward into 2014 and beyond.

The Guild at 51 is a new shop and gallery space for members of the Gloucestershire Guild...

Dursley

Three floors of a Victorian warehouse house interactive displays and galleries, which...

Gloucester Cathedral of honey coloured lime stone is a place of worship and architectural...

This unique garden restoration, situated in a hidden valley, dates from a period when...

Planning on visiting the amazing WWT Slimbridge Wetlands Centre?...If so, click here to...

The Country House Retreat with the Town House Treats.

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