Bromyard is a starting place of the A465 road which runs to the M4 in South Wales. The town centre is bypassed by the A44 road that connects Aberystwyth to Oxford. Bromyard is notable for its many old and historically interesting buildings that are designated blue plaque buildings, especially in High Street, Broad Street, Market Square, Sherford Street and Rowberry Street, including a number of half-timbered public-houses and dwelling houses.

The Bromyard Gala, an annual weekend festival of country sports, vintage vehicles and displays of various kinds, is held in the vicinity in July.[31]

Obvious bays contrasted with fronted ornate pedimented doric columns at the entrance. Venetian windows hint at the Georgian Grand Tour and the stylistic architecture typical of the county. It also contains a remarkable baluster staircase. In horse country it was usual to have outbuildings and stables made of stone.[44] There was a blacksmith's nearby next to 21 acres of woodland.

The Bromyard & District Local History Society was founded in 1966 and is extremely active, with a centre open three days a week which contains a large archive and library and an exhibition room.[28]

Corinthian capitals atop decorated columns were in the same school as Inkberrow and Bromsberrow Place in the neighbouring county. The older east and front wings were made of stone; bent or chamfered roof beams vacated space in loft for living. Amongst the extensive stabling and outbuildings were hop kilns, a brewhouse, bakehouse and cider house, and octagonal dove cote. But the house was dilapidated by 1939 when occupied by the evacuated Westminster School.

After the Reformation (1545) there were 800 communicants making Bromyard then "a markett toune...greately Replenyshed with People", the third town in the county with a population of about 1200 souls.[12] By 1664 Bromyard had fallen behind Leominster, Ledbury and Ross in population.[13] Besides the central town area, the large parish used to consist of the three townships of Winslow, Linton, and Norton; these areas were civil parishes in the 20th century.[14]

The apple tree enclosure was the cultivated nature of Mapleton Barn when first settled in late 13th century. A yeoman farmer took on the orchards, livestock in Jacobean period, but was merged by tenant farmer John Smith with Newbarns in 1777.

Members of the public are welcome!  Click here.... for the agenda!

Click to open image! Click to open image!   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.bromyard.info/#sigProGalleriafcd1a4a8e5 A person was rescued from a car following a crash on the B4203 Stanford-on-Teme, Bromyard.

There are two electoral wards, Bromyard West and Bromyard Bringsty. The latter includes several villages to the north east.

Three large blocks comprised The Rhea in 1838, the forerunner of a much larger complex in late 20th century. In 1851 Thomas Gardiner farmed the land of 220 acres with 7 labourers. A brick house was built in 1900, with several 19th century workers stone cottages. A timber-framed stone barn was erected in 18th century for a cow byre and stone stables.

The 465 acres of land area in Rowden (meaning a rough hill) was occupied by Sir John la Moigne in 1300 when he built the first chapel there. The house was named after the ancient Rowdon family of Burley Gate, who occupied it during the English Civil Wars. Edward Rowden built a new house in 1651 on the ruins of the medieval buildings; its dovecote was a local landmark of "circular stone". It was unoccupied by 1721.

Bromyard is the home of Nozstock: The Hidden Valley Festival which attracts around 5,000 visitors at the end of July every year. This three-day event showcases bands from around the country across nine stages, alongside dance arenas, a cinema, a theatre and comedy stage, circus, and a vintage tractor arena.[30]

Bromyard borough has a town council. Herefordshire Council is a unitary authority.

Calling all businesses to a special meeting on 21st September at the Falcon Hotel. Meeting time is at 5.30pm so that you can drop in on your way home. 

Click to open image! Click to open image!   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.bromyard.info/#sigProGalleria21eab9a311 Bromyard Community Transport has just taken delivery of a brand new minibus, thanks to government funding.

Bromyard hosts a three-day folk festival each year in September, which particularly concentrates on English traditional music. It is one of the largest events of its kind in the country.[32]

The Tack was probably a successful medieval sheep farm since the name is derived from the Anglo-Saxon tacca. A farmhouse stood on the Tenbury Road; built of stone in 1838 it contained a large hop kiln and granary in a complex of buildings, now part of the dwelling. Among its quirky features included two bays in a stable block once used as servants quarters that were built circa 1800.

During World War I, Bromyard was the site of an internment camp, where the Irish nationalist Terence MacSwiney, future Lord Mayor of Cork and hunger striker, was both interned and married.[26] In World War II, between autumn 1940 and 1945, Westminster School was temporarily relocated to a variety of buildings on the outskirts of the town, principally Buckenhill, and including for various purposes Brockhampton, Clater Park, Whitbourne Rectory, Fernie, and Saltmarshe Castle.[27]

A meeting of the Town Council to be held on Monday 19th September 2016 at 7:30pm in the Council Chamber, Council Offices, Bromyard.

Click to open image! Click to open image!   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.bromyard.info/#sigProGalleria06b764f3b4 Two double extension ladders Surplus to requirements - one off 4.5 metres closed – 8 metres fully extendedand one off 3.5 metres closed – 7 metres fully extended. No charge, but a donation towards Bromyard Christmas Light fund would be appreciated

In 21st century Winslow parish was once again merged into Bromyard Town borough due to urban developments.[47]

The medieval Manor of Norton was constrained by extensive parkland and hunting-grounds amounting a total of 3,183 acres.[52]

There will be a presentation by the Bromyard Speed Festival with a review on this year's festival and the exciting plans for next year

Click to open image! Click to open image!   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.bromyard.info/#sigProGalleria48f1666c09 A school which was placed into special measures last year after a dip in exam results has been commended for 'taking effective action' by inspectors.

The original medieval moated abbey beside the River Frome was demolished in about 1790. The present Rowden Abbey was rebuilt in 1881 as a half-timbered mansion for landowner Henry J Bailey.[51] Similar to the above houses in style and decoration, it also exhibited fine gabled porch entrances. The interior had pannelling and ribbed ceilings, with delightful bay windows in the reception rooms.

A farm of 110 acres existed at Hardwick Manor. This was named for Anthony Hardwick in 1575 when he purchased the freehold. His descendant John, fell into debt, and in 1755 was forced to sell Hardwick Hall, which was demolished, and the rest of the estate was sold to Thomas Griffiths of Stoke Lacy. The manor house was rebuilt on the site.[45]

Click to open image! Click to open image! Click to open image! Click to open image!   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.bromyard.info/#sigProGalleria3f888b746b It's not too far from the truth to say that Roger Pugh's job is a laugh a minute. The 67-year-old from Bromyard is one of the few professional jesters in the country.

The Royal Oak is a traditional, 300 year old black and white country pub and eating house. Our team is growing and we’re looking for an energetic, loyal and... ... Read article

Click to open image! Click to open image! Click to open image! Click to open image!   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.bromyard.info/#sigProGalleria95a13ab7dc A new 'centre of excellence' for the ancient art of bell ringing is being launched in Bromyard.

The Conquest Theatre (run by volunteers) offers a programme of plays, films, variety, musicals, operettas, ballet, pantomime and concerts, in a purpose-built centre constructed in 1991.[29]

Mothers Day is early this year! Cold outside but toasty and warm at the Royal Oak with both of our open fires blazing... ... Read article

A meeting of the Town Council to be held on Monday 18th July 2016 at 7:30pm in the Council Chamber, Council Offices, Bromyard.

A meeting of the Planning and Economicc Development Committee to be held on Monday 5th September 2016 at 7:30pm in the Council Chamber, Council Offices, Bromyard.

Bromyard

Last year a flier was produced giving information on all events taking place on that day. This year we would like to repeat this and if possible produce a leaflet if we have enough material.

Bromyard.info is the community website for Bromyard and District. Run as a Community Interest Company by volunteers, it is an 'online daily news site', has a full events calendar; features places of interest, accommodation, pubs, restaurants and shopping directory, together with a full local directory.

Bromyard is one of three market towns in the parliamentary constituency of North Herefordshire. The current member (2016) is Conservative Bill Wiggins MP.

Click to open image! Click to open image!   View the embedded image gallery online at: http://www.bromyard.info/#sigProGalleria7e1c7668f9 Bromyard Football Club have pulled out of the HFA County League before a ball has been kicked.

There is a lively U3A branch, and a "Poetry for Pleasure" group.

Bromyard is served by a monthly community magazine called Off the Record. It is published on the first Friday of each month and contains 60 pages of news from community groups.