Barnstaple has cool, wet winters and mild, wet summers. Temperatures range from 9 C (48 F) in January to 21 C (70 F) in July. October is the wettest month with 103 mm (4.1 in) of rain. The record high is 34 C (94 F), and the record low is −9 C (16 F). Barnstaple gets 862 mm (33.9 in) of rain per year, with rain on 138 days.

Once upon a time it was the third megalopolis of Devon – but could it really be quite the place again?

Schools Primaries: Pilton Bluecoat C of E, Yeo Valley, Our Lady’s Catholic, Ashleigh C of E, Orchard Vale and Sticklepath Community are all “good”, Ofsted says, with Newport Community “outstanding”. Secondaries: the Park and Pilton Community College are both “good”.

The earliest settlement in the area was probably at Pilton on the bank of the River Yeo, now a northern suburb of the present town. Pilton is recorded in the Burghal Hidage (c. 917) as a burh founded by Alfred the Great,[8] and it may have been the site of a Viking attack in 893,[9] but by the later 10th century Barnstaple had taken over its role of local defence. Barnstaple had its own mint before the Norman Conquest.[8]

In 2005 unemployment in North Devon was 1.8–2.4%, and the median per capita wage for North Devon was 73% of the UK national average. The level of work in the informal or casual sector is high, partly due to the impact of seasonal tourism, as is the case in much of the South West of England.

Barnstaple was one of the boroughs reformed by the Municipal Reform Act 1835. Between the 1930s and the 1950s the town swallowed the villages of Pilton, Newport, and Roundswell through ribbon development.

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Hang out at… Your ordinary pub kind of place. In need of innovation. Head out of town to Broomhill Art hotel, or the Muddiford Inn, the Fremington Quay Cafe or the New Inn at Goodleigh.

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The greater part of the town lies on the eastern bank of the estuary, connected to the western side by the ancient Barnstaple Long Bridge which has 16 arches.[8] The early medieval layout of the town is still apparent from the street plan and street names, with Boutport Street ("About the Port") following the curved line of the ditch outside the town walls.[17] The area of medieval shipbuilding and repair is still called The Strand, the Old English word for shore.

As a major town, Barnstaple is more ethnically diverse than the North Devon district (95.9% White British) and Devon as a whole (94.2% White British). Barnstaple has a similar ethnic make-up compared with other south west towns, like Truro and Cullompton.

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Do you live in South Norwood and Thornton Heath, south London? Do you have a favourite haunt or a pet hate? If so, email lets.move@theguardian.com by Tuesday 19 April.

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Barnstaple Carnival is taking place on Saturday 17th, starting at 3pm ... read more

A mass demonstration against cuts to the local health service will take to the streets of Barnstaple in October for North Devon Sees Red Day on Saturday, October 22.... read more

If you need help in choosing a place that meets your requirements, telephone us at the TIC on 01271 375000 (we're open Monday to Saturday, 10.00am to 4.00pm, all year).

Although for a time between 1680 and 1730, Barnstaple's trade was surpassed by Bideford's, it retained its economic importance until the early 20th century,[12] when it was manufacturing lace, gloves, sail-cloth and fishing-nets, it had extensive potteries, tanneries, sawmills and foundries, and shipbuilding was also carried on.[18]

The case against Lacks va-va-voom. The centre has messed-about spots (ring roads, banal 80s offices) and the High Street is humdrum. Without the car parks and big roads, its riverside could be amazing.

There's something for everyone at Barnstaple's historic Pannier Market

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Barnstaple i/ˈbɑːrnstəbəl/ or /ˈbɑːrnstəpəl/[1] is the main town of North Devon, England, and possibly the oldest borough in the United Kingdom. It is a former river-port, located at the lowest crossing-point of the River Taw, flowing into the Bristol Channel.

MUMS-TO-BE look set to be forced to travel to Exeter, Plymouth or Taunton to give birth under leaked plans to close North Devon District Hospital's maternity unit.

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Barnstaple

Barnstaple parish's population in the 1801 census was 3,748, in the 1901 census 9,698, and in the 2001 census, the population was 22,497.[24]

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Built on the other side of the street at the same time as the Pannier Market, Butchers Row consists of ten shops with pilasters of Bath Stone, and wrought iron supports to an overhanging roof. Only two of the shops remain as butchers although the new shops still sell local agricultural goods. There is one baker, one delicatessen, two fishmongers, a florist and a greengrocer.

Well connected? Trains: hourly on the Tarka Line to Exeter (66-82 mins). Driving: 15-20 mins to the beaches and Exmoor, 45 mins to the M5, an hour to Taunton and just over an hour to Exeter.

National Express services to London, Heathrow Airport, Taunton, Bristol and Birmingham also run services from Barnstaple.

Whilst the 1989 opening of the improved A361 connection to the motorway network helped in some ways to promote trade, notably weekend tourism, it had a detrimental effect on a number of distribution businesses. The latter had previously viewed the town as a base for local distribution networks, a need that was removed with an approximate halving of travelling time to the M5 motorway.

Click here to view a comprehensive selection of four different types of holiday accommodation in nine areas of North Devon and Exmoor using our helpful search page. Make a selection and then contact the proprietors direct.

In 2012, the county of Devon 58%[33] of students achieved 5 GCSEs grade A* to C. The UK average is 59%.[33]

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There are a selection of well-regarded primary and secondary state schools and a tertiary college in Barnstaple.

Since 1974, Barnstaple has been a civil parish governed by town council.[2] The parish itself had a population of 24,033[3] and including the satellite settlements known as the Barnstaple Town Area, it is 53,514.

Welcome to the Barnstaple Town Centre Business Directory. Our business directory is a great place to advertise your business. We offer business advertising through a range of different categories, banners and fixed links. If you would like to advertise your North Devon Business please see our advertising page. If there is not a category suitable below for your business please do not hesitate to Contact Us

Following frequent bus services operate from Barnstaple:

Other religious buildings in the town include St Anne's Chapel (a 14th-century chantry chapel, now a museum) in the parish churchyard; Holy Trinity, built in the 1840s but necessarily rebuilt in 1867 as its foundations were unsound—it has a fine tower in the Somerset style; the Roman Catholic church of the Immaculate Conception, said to have been built to designs supplied by Pugin, in Romanesque Revival style; and a Baptist chapel of 1870 which includes a lecture hall and classrooms.[12][17]

Since 1974 Barnstaple has been a civil parish governed by a town council.[2]

Barnstaple is twinned with Barnstable, Massachusetts in the USA, Uelzen in Germany, Trouville-sur-Mer in France,[26] and Susa in Italy.