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Perhaps needless to say, this is the film that made Mel Gibson an international star.

The musical score for Mad Max 2 was composed and conducted by Australian composer Brian May, who had previously composed the music for the first film. A soundtrack album was released in 1982 by Varèse Sarabande.[21]

With personal crises and age weighing in on them, LAPD officers Riggs and Murtaugh must contend with a deadly Chinese crimelord trying to get his brother out of prison.

Director Miller keeps the pic moving with cyclonic force, photography by Dean Semler is first class, editing is supertight, and Brian May's music is stirring.

A straightforward action/adventure film, filled to the brim with over-the-top chases and stunts.

Miller doesn't take his foot off the accelerator for a second, and the ingeniously designed and staged road action is stunning.

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The Tomatometer rating – based on the published opinions of hundreds of film and television critics – is a trusted measurement of movie and TV programming quality for millions of moviegoers. It represents the percentage of professional critic reviews that are positive for a given film or television show.

Out of the countless action movies produced in the 1980s, there only a few genuine works of art; [this film] might very well be the best of that extremely rarefied company.

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Principal photography took place over the course of twelve weeks in the winter of 1981 near Broken Hill.[16] Scenes were shot at the Pinnacles, where the set of the compound was situated.[17] The scene where the Pursuit Special rolls over and explodes was shot at Menindee Road on the Mundi Mundi Plains just outside Broken Hill.[18][19]

Back at the refinery but intercut with the tanker pursuit, a handful of marauders seize the empty compound, and discover to their misfortune that the refinery is rigged to explode. Max and the feral kid find themselves alone against the remaining marauders, who continue their savage pursuit. Wez boards the truck and almost slays the two survivors, but a head-on collision with Humungus obliterates both villains. Max loses control of the tanker and it rolls off the side of the road.

Exhilarating entertainment -- and a textbook for sophisticated, popular moviemaking.

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The film's comic-book post-apocalyptic style affectionately dubbed "diesel punk" popularized the post-apocalyptic genre in film and fiction writing. The film eventually became a Cult Classic: fan clubs and "road warrior"-themed activities still occur in the 2000s.

The sets, costumes, makeup, special effects and stunts are all first-rate, as is Gibson's performance.

Mad Max 2 was released on 24 December 1981, and received ample critical acclaim. Observers praised the visuals and Gibson's role. Noteworthy elements of the film also include cinematographer Dean Semler's widescreen photography of Australia's vast desert landscapes; the sparing use of dialogue throughout the film; costume designer Norma Moriceau's punk mohawked, leather bondage gear-wearing bikers; and its fast-paced, tightly edited and violent battle and chase scenes.

After rescuing the feral kid from the tanker, Max discovers that its tank is filled with sand. He was unknowingly set up as a decoy to draw away the marauders while Pappagallo's tribe escaped with concealed petrol barrels. An epilogue shows the Gyro Captain taking Pappagallo's place as leader of the tribe. The narrator (now revealed as the feral kid) explains that he would follow them and in time become leader of the Great Northern Tribe himself, but he never saw Max again.

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Martin Riggs and Roger Murtaugh pursue an arms dealer who is a former LAPD officer.

A veteran policeman, Murtaugh, is partnered with a younger, suicidal officer, Riggs. They both have one thing in common: hating working in pairs. Now they must learn to work with one another to stop a gang of drug smugglers.

The film has a permanent legacy in the small town of Silverton, which is 25 kilometres from Broken Hill in New South Wales, Australia. A museum dedicated to Mad Max 2 was established in 2010 by Adrian and Linda Bennett, who developed the museum after moving to Silverton and building a collection of Mad Max props and memorabilia.[36]

A team of commandos on a mission in a Central American jungle find themselves hunted by an extraterrestrial warrior.

Humungus' Ford F-100 Humungus' bizarre vehicle is a heavily modified Ford F-100 Ute, which is depicted with a custom-made Nitrous Oxide booster system. The marauders use an early 1970s red F-100 with a cobra painted on the doors, and a cut-down boat-style windshield during the final chase scenes.

The Road Warrior (1982)

An all-action movie that delivers all the violence and entertainment you could want.

Richard Scheib calls Mad Max 2, "...one of the few occasions where a sequel makes a dramatic improvement in quality over its predecessor." He calls it a "kinetic comic-book of a film," an "... exhilarating non-stop rollercoaster ride of a film that contains some of the most exciting stunts and car crashes ever put on screen."

The movie waas first presented in a test screening in November 1981 with a world wide release in December 1981. It was the first Australian movie to have Dolby Stereo sound.

In a dystopic and crime-ridden Detroit, a terminally wounded cop returns to the force as a powerful cyborg haunted by submerged memories.

Gibson is suprisingly uncharismatic, but Miller makes up for it with whizz bang action.

The film was released in 1981 worldwide as 'Mad Max 2' but for its American release, the films title was changed to 'The Road Warrior' since the original Mad Max wasn't a popular film when it was released in America, so much of the American public thought it was a stand alone film and not a sequel.

The film's depiction of a post-apocalyptic future was widely copied by other filmmakers and in science fiction novels, to the point that its gritty "junkyard society of the future look...is almost taken for granted in the modern science-fiction action film."[5] The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction says that Mad Max 2, "with all its comic-strip energy and vividness...is exploitation cinema at its most inventive."[30]

The film's depiction of a post-apocalyptic future was widely copied by other filmmakers and in science fiction novels, to the point that its gritty "...junkyard society of the future look...is almost taken for granted in the modern sf action film."[13] The Encyclopedia Of Science Fiction says that Mad Max 2, "...with all its comic-strip energy and vividness...is exploitation cinema at its most inventive."

Inspired by Joseph Campbell's The Hero with a Thousand Faces and the work of Carl Jung,[14] Miller recruited Hayes to join the production as a scriptwriter.[15] Brian Hannant also came on board as co-writer and second unit director. Miller says that he was greatly influenced by the films of Akira Kurosawa.[2]

A former Australian policeman now living in the post-apocalyptic Australian outback as a warrior agrees to help a community of survivors living in a gasoline refinery to defend them and their gasoline supplies from evil barbarian warriors. Written by Daniel Williamson

Noteworthy elements of the film include cinematographer Dean Semler's widescreen photography of Australia's vast desert landscapes (primarily the Mundi Mundi Plain in Silverton, New South Wales); the sparing use of dialogue throughout the film (which is almost non-existent during the opening and closing scenes); costume designer Norma Moriceau's punk mohawked, leather-bondage-gear wearing bikers; and its fast-paced, tightly-edited, and violent battle and chase scenes.

In 1997, when the U.S. president crashes into Manhattan, now a giant maximum security prison, a convicted bank robber is sent in to rescue him.