In Paris, a former policeman falls in love with a prostitute, and tries to get her out of that life by paying for all of her time.

Days of Wine and Roses is a 1962 drama film directed by Blake Edwards with a screenplay by JP Miller adapted from his own 1958 Playhouse 90 teleplay of the same name.

The producers used the following ironic tagline to market the film:

Williams' version was recorded for Columbia Records. It was released as catalog number 42674. The song reached #9 on the adult contemporary chart and #26 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart,[2] and was the featured track of an album by Williams of the same name, which peaked at #1 on the Billboard 200 album chart.

JP Miller found his title in the 1896 poem "Vitae Summa Brevis Spem Nos Vetat Incohare Longam" by the English writer Ernest Dowson (1867–1900):[3] It also inspired the title song devised by Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer.

The picture opened in wide release in the United States on December 26, 1962. The box office receipts for the film were good given the numbers reported are in 1962 dollars. It earned $4 million in US theatrical rentals,[7] making it the 15th highest grossing film of the year. Total domestic sales were $8,123,077.[1]

San Francisco public relations executive Joe Clay (Jack Lemmon) meets and falls in love with Kirsten Arnesen (Lee Remick), a secretary. Kirsten is a teetotaler until Joe introduces her to social drinking. She is reluctant at first, but after her first few Brandy Alexanders, she admits that having a drink "made me feel good." Despite the misgivings of Kirsten's father (Charles Bickford), who runs a San Mateo landscaping business, they marry and have a daughter named Debbie.

Mancini's version was also recorded for RCA Victor. It was released as catalog number 47-8120. (#33 pop, #10 easy listening; listed by Chartmasters as one of the Top 100 songs of 1963.)[3]

Coincidentally, Johnny Mercer, who wrote the lyrics for the title tune, had also written the lyrics for the theme from Laura, a 1944 film in which Dowson's poem is quoted in its entirety.

On the Cash Box chart, where all singles were combined together, the song reached a peak position of #30 in May 1963.

The music was written by Henry Mancini with lyrics by Johnny Mercer.[1] They received the Academy Award for Best Original Song for their work.[1] In 2004 it finished at #39 in AFI's 100 Years...100 Songs survey of top tunes in American cinema.

The desperate life of a chronic alcoholic is followed through a four-day drinking bout.

Comedy-drama about life on a not particularly important ship of the US Navy during WW2.

An Ohio sales executive accepts a higher position within the company and travels to New York City with his wife for his job interview but things go wrong from the start.

A DVD of the film was released on January 6, 2001 by Warner Home Video. The DVD contains an extra commentary track by director Blake Edwards, and an interview with Jack Lemmon. A laserdisc was released in 1990.

R&B/soul singer Miki Howard recorded a cover version for her 2008 album, Private Collection. Robin Gibb's version was released posthumously as a track on the 2014 album, 50 St. Catherine's Drive.

An American junior diplomat in London rents a house from, and falls in love with, a woman suspected of murder.

When an idealistic writer disappears during the Right Wing military coup in 1973 Chile, his wife and American businessman father try to find him.

An Academy Award went to the film's theme music, composed by Mancini with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. The film received four other Oscar nominations, including Best Actor and Best Actress.

Two friends try sharing an apartment, but their ideas of housekeeping and lifestyles are as different as night and day.

They are not long, the days of wine and roses:   Out of a misty dream Our path emerges for a while, then closes   Within a dream.

Hungerford warns him that he must keep sober no matter what, even if that means staying away from Kirsten. He explains to Joe how alcoholics often demonstrate obsessive behavior, pointing out that Kirsten's previous love of chocolate may have been the first sign of an addictive personality, and counsels him that most drinkers hate to drink alone in the company of sober people.

Joe finally gets sober, becomes a responsible father to Debbie and holds down a steady job. He tries to make amends with his father-in-law by offering him a payment for past debts and wrongs, but Mr. Arnesen accuses him of being indirectly responsible for Kirsten's alcoholism. After calming down, Arnesen says that Kirsten has been disappearing for long stretches of time and picking up strangers in bars.

A disillusioned aging decent man and once proud WWII veteran is dealing with midlife crisis as well as a tough moral dilemma. If he wants his small near-bankrupt clothing company to survive, he has two days to let go of his shaken morals.

The movie was produced by Martin Manulis, with music by Henry Mancini, and features Jack Lemmon, Lee Remick, Charles Bickford and Jack Klugman.[2] The film depicts the downward spiral of two average Americans who succumb to alcoholism and attempt to deal with their problems.

Margaret Parsons, film curator at the National Gallery of Art, said, "[The film] remains one of the most gut-wrenching dramas of alcohol-related ruin and recovery ever captured on film...and it's also one of the pioneering films of the genre."[11]

Gladys Glover has just lost her modelling job when she meets filmmaker Pete Sheppard shooting a documentary in Central Park. For Pete it's love at first sight, but Gladys has her mind on ... See full summary »

The phrase "days of wine and roses" is originally from the poem "Vitae Summa Brevis" by the English writer Ernest Dowson (1867–1900):

A crooked lawyer persuades his brother-in-law to feign a serious injury.

A love-struck landlord tries to convince a pretty tenant to dump her fiance and give him a chance.

Days Of Wine And Roses (1963)

"Days of Wine and Roses" is a popular song, from the 1962 movie of the same name.[1]

Como's version was recorded for RCA Victor Records. The recording was made on March 19, 1963. The record was issued by RCA Victor as a track on the album, The Songs I Love.

The song is composed of two sentences, one for each stanza. They are each sung as three lines.

The review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes reported that 100% of critics gave the film a positive review, based on seven reviews.[12]

Joe and Kirsten slowly go from the "two-martini lunch" to full-blown alcoholism. Joe is demoted due to poor performance, and is sent out of town to work on a minor account. Kirsten is alone all day, and finds the best way to pass the time is to drink. While drunk one afternoon, she causes a fire in their apartment and almost kills herself and their child. Joe eventually gets fired, and goes from job to job over the next several years.

The film's Northern California locations included San Francisco, Albany and the Golden Gate Fields racetrack. The Oscar-winning title song had music by Henry Mancini and lyrics by Johnny Mercer. Single records by Andy Williams and the Henry Mancini chorus made the Billboard Top 40.

The film became one of Blake Edwards' best-regarded films, opening to praise from the critics and audiences alike. New York Times film critic Bosley Crowther wrote, "[It] is a commanding picture, and it is extremely well played by Mr. Lemmon and Miss Remick, who spare themselves none of the shameful, painful scenes. But for all their brilliant performing and the taut direction of Blake Edwards, they do not bring two pitiful characters to complete and overpowering life."[8]

A man with an asthmatic voice telephones bank clerk Kelly Sherwood at home and coerces her into helping him steal a large sum from her bank.

Find showtimes, watch trailers, browse photos, track your Watchlist and rate your favorite movies and TV shows on your phone or tablet!