The high street retail businessman was named by Lord Peter Hain in the House of Lords as the tycoon accused of harassment and protected by an injunction.

Green (Mr) has just been blasted by Parliament’s work and pensions committee’s investigation into the collapse of Carillion, where he was chairman.

We can remember him, perhaps, as a skilled retailer who shouted a lot,  but at least had the balls to call MPs  “a bunch of wankers”. A reasonable opinion.

Sir Philip has said he intends to lodge a formal complaint with the House of Lords authorities against Lord Hain for failing to declare he was a paid adviser to the law firm representing the Telegraph when he made his intervention.

“If anything I’ve said has caused offence, I’m happy to apologise. Nothing I’ve said was ever meant to be offensive.”

The race to be the least popular businessman called Philip Green — the one with the least admirable legacy — has always been competitive. Lately, the less famous Philip Green (the Mr not the Sir) is well ahead.

Why did Coloroll go bust? Aggressive accounting, rather like Carillion. Hm.

The Arcadia boss also pointed out that his payment of £363 million into the BHS pension scheme last year had not received enough credit: “I wrote a cheque for £363 million,” Green continued.

Are the MPs conducting hard-headed investigations or trying to get their name in the papers? It feels too much like the latter for comfort.

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The Arcadia boss also said he would be “happy to apologise” if anything he had said had “caused offence” after being named as the leading businessman at the centre of Britain’s #MeToo scandal.

Those who supposedly burst into tears under his pressure, well, maybe they were in the wrong job.

The race to be the least popular businessman called Philip Green — the one with the least admirable legacy — has always been competitive. Lately, the less famous Philip Green (the Mr not the Sir) is well ahead.

On the other hand, maybe we don’t need to be that delicate. Green’s approach was patter, it was for effect. Sometimes you got the impression that the swearing was a holding device while he reached for other words. He liked to accuse journalists of trying to be clever, perhaps masking the insecure feeling that at some level he was not.

If Shah is right, that Green’s entire empire is at risk, that his hubris may well be followed by nemesis, then it’s hard to say Green doesn’t deserve it.

Jane Shepherdson claims that tycoon’s behaviour at work was ‘worse than most’

During the first public interview Green has given since selling BHS for £1 to Dominic Chappell in 2015, Green said he regrets the decision to sell the chain he owned for 15 years, but that the attacks levelled at him were fuelled by jealousy.

We can remember him, perhaps, as a skilled retailer who shouted a lot,  but at least had the balls to call MPs  “a bunch of wankers”. A reasonable opinion.

Lord Hain, the former Labour cabinet minister, used parliamentary privilege last week to tell the House of Lords Sir Philip was behind an injunction preventing the Telegraph publishing details of accusations of sexual harassment and racial abuse by five former employees and payments made to alleged victims.

The collapse of Carillion is a story of “recklessness, hubris and greed”, says Frank Field.

The BBC has reported prior that the businessman told the corporation he intends to complain to the Lord’s authorities that Lord Hain failed to disclose he had a financial relationship with the Telegraph’s lawyers.

Shah is in the right job. He describes Green’s approach as “menacing banter”. As he assaults the author in the process of his pursuit of the BHS story, Green sometimes backs off, admits he knows it’s all part of a game, albeit one with high stakes. That he and Shah are just on different sides.

Green, says the report, was the  cheerleader-in-chief. An “unquestioning optimist when his role was to challenge”. Directors including Green were delusional, deceitful, rotten and much else besides.

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Dominic Chappell mulls legal action against Sir Philip Green

The thing is, long-term watchers of his career aren’t entirely surprised by the rebuke of a man who seemed to think he was beyond criticism.

Worst Philip Green

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The identification of Sir Philip led to fresh calls for the Honours Forfeiture Committee to consider withdrawing his knighthood. Similar calls were made over the scandal over shortfalls in the BHS pension scheme.

The newspaper complained in their reporting that they could not name the businessman, due to the injunction.

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Read more: What is parliamentary privilege? Why Peter Hain could name Sir Philip Green despite his injunction

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Are the MPs conducting hard-headed investigations or trying to get their name in the papers? It feels too much like the latter for comfort.

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Green (Mr) has just been blasted by Parliament’s work and pensions committee’s investigation into the collapse of Carillion, where he was chairman.

The collapse of Carillion is a story of “recklessness, hubris and greed”, says Frank Field.