Thinking of positive things can be difficult if you’re used to putting yourself down. Try writing down your moods every day. This will encourage you to question your negative thoughts and pay more attention to the amazing things that make you who you are.

By looking after yourself this way, you will naturally feel better and have more energy.

Citation: Shi J, Wang L, Yao Y, Su N, Zhao X and Zhan C (2017) Family Function and Self-esteem among Chinese University Students with and without Grandparenting Experience: Moderating Effect of Social Support. Front. Psychol. 8:886. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00886

Self-esteem and mental health are closely linked but low self-esteem isn't a mental health problem itself. Some of the experiences of low self-esteem can also be symptoms of mental health problems, such as:

Be kind
Help a friend or do a little task without being asked. Phone someone who you haven't spoken to in a while. Bake a cake or cook a meal for someone. Offer to walk a neighbour's dog or volunteer for a charity.

Parents and carers have a role to play in helping children and young people develop healthy self-esteem.

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Keywords: social support, self-esteem, family function, Chinese university students, grandparenting

Change the way you think
Taking the time to notice when things go well and realising when you're being too hard on yourself can improve your self-esteem and make you feel better.

          -  Have a positive view of themselves
          -  Make friends easily and adapt to new situations
          -  Can play on their own or in groups
          -  Will try to work things out for themselves but are willing to ask if unsure
          -  Can be proud of their achievements
          -  Can admits their mistakes and learn from them
          -  Are willing to try new things and adapt to change

Is low self-esteem a mental health problem?

Click the images below to download activities you can do with your children to help them to think positively about themselves and increase their self-esteem. Once you have completed the activities you can them put them on the fridge or keep them somewhere handy so your child can remind themselves of all the positive things about them when they aren't feeling so good.

The world's most-cited Multidisciplinary Psychology journal

Change the way you think
Taking the time to notice when things go well and realising when you're being too hard on yourself can improve your self-esteem and make you feel better.

Self-esteem is how we think and feel about ourselves. Having healthy self-esteem means being comfortable with how we look and how we feel. It means feeling good about ourselves, our abilities and our thoughts.

Self-esteem and mental health are closely linked but low self-esteem isn't a mental health problem itself. Some of the experiences of low self-esteem can also be symptoms of mental health problems, such as:

Citation: Shi J, Wang L, Yao Y, Su N, Zhao X and Zhan C (2017) Family Function and Self-esteem among Chinese University Students with and without Grandparenting Experience: Moderating Effect of Social Support. Front. Psychol. 8:886. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00886

Promoting self-esteem in your child is incredibly important. Staying positive and being generous with encouragement and praise are two of the most important steps any adult can take to help promote a child's self-esteem. 

Promoting self-esteem in your child is incredibly important. Staying positive and being generous with encouragement and praise are two of the most important steps any adult can take to help promote a child's self-esteem. 

Watch your words
Sometimes the way you say something can make a big difference to how you feel and what others think of you. Take a few moments before you answer a question - this will give you time to think of what to say instead of mumbling.

Talk to your children about how they feel. If they are not feeling confident in themselves there are a number of things you can do to help support them which we have already mentioned on the page. There are also a few things you can encourage your children to do to try to help boost their confidence and self-esteem.

Look after yourself
If you feel good physically you are more likely to feel good in your mind. Eating healthily and doing exercise can make a big difference. Try not to eat a lot of processed food like crisps, chocolate and ready meals. And don’t drink too much coffee. Instead, choose fresh fruit and vegetables and drink plenty of water.

By looking after yourself this way, you will naturally feel better and have more energy.

Université Paris Nanterre, France

Parents and carers have a role to play in helping children and young people develop healthy self-esteem.

Self-esteem And Family

Talk to your children about how they feel. If they are not feeling confident in themselves there are a number of things you can do to help support them which we have already mentioned on the page. There are also a few things you can encourage your children to do to try to help boost their confidence and self-esteem.

*Correspondence: Jingyu Shi, shijingyu2005@126.com

Young people with low self-esteem can find it very hard to cope with pressures from school, peers and society. The teenage, and increasingly pre-teen years can be very stressful as youngsters are expected to achieve good grades, look a certain way and be successful or popular. Children and young people with low self-esteem are more at risk of developing depression, anxiety, self-harming and other mental health problems as they grow up, and will often find the ups and downs of life in general harder to get through.

Most children and young people will have dips in self-esteem as they go through different stages and challenges. Starting or changing school, moving house, changes in the family can all affect a child’s self-esteem but with support they can get through this.

     -  feeling hopeless
     -  blaming yourself unfairly
     -  disliking yourself
     -  worrying about being unable to do things

TABLE 3. Hierarchical regression analysis predicting self-esteem from family function and social support.

The world's most-cited Multidisciplinary Psychology journal

Try something new
Try a new thing every day. It should be something that you wouldn’t usually do. It could be a small thing, from styling your hair differently to volunteering to read out loud in class or joining a team.

3Medical School of Tongji University, Shanghai, China

Listen to music
Music can have a powerful impact on us. Whenever you begin to doubt yourself, try listening to songs that make you feel positive about life and about yourself.

1East Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China

If you are not sure, ask the person to repeat the question or say you don't understand. Don't pretend to know. Try using words like 'yes' and 'no' instead of 'sort of' and 'not really'. This can make you sound more clear and confident.

2Student Counselling Center, Tongji University, Shanghai, China

FIGURE 1. Effects of general family function and social support on self-esteem scores.