There’s not a morose feeling in my school because it’s a bloody good school and people want to stay. But if I were in a different school, with a different demographic, it would be catastrophic.

It also appointed new specialists in drama, science and design technology, but government inspectors and the school's own headmaster highlight music as the catalyst that changed the school.

John Tomsett, the headteacher of Huntington school in York, said that while the city still had relatively low funding, schools in York benefited more than any other local authority from the new formula’s increase in base funding. However, he said the formula “should not be about redistributing the same-sized pot. Instead, the pot needs to get bigger.”

Government inspectors had put Feversham Primary in special measures. This means they thought the school was offering an unacceptable standard of education and needed new leadership. In November 2012 it had become an Academy, run by a trust.

The survey results, released today, reveal how schools are trying to make ends meet and highlight a significant number turning to parents for help.

A spokesman for WCAT reiterated its statement from September which said: "Together with the DfE, we will ensure that our academies get the support they need now, and as part of new trusts, to secure the educational experience of children in the schools."

Speaking about the ISBL launch, school standards minister Nick Gibb said: “School business professionals have an important role in helping schools deploy their resources efficiently to ensure a maximum focus on delivering high-quality education and a rigorous curriculum for their pupils.

The council is pursuing the matter with the Department for Education. WCAT declined to comment on the claims.

"My number one rule is that it should always be a joy, never a torture," says Rotheram.

Dougal Shaw is on Twitter: @dougalshawBBC

The group put together a deficit-reduction plan that closed three elementary schools starting in the 2017 school year.

A spokesman for the Department for Education said: "The vast majority – 91 per cent – of the primary free schools approved last month are in areas of basic need. But the truth is that English schools have not been good enough for far too long. We make no apologies for encouraging new people to come forward to run free schools. The evidence proves that new schools also encourage the ones which already exist to raise their game.

A report by the National Audit Office has said schools face cuts of 8% in real terms by 2019-20. While the government said school funding would be ringfenced, headteachers are facing a mountain of increased costs: higher contributions to national insurance and teachers’ pensions, the introduction of the “national living wage”, pay rises and the apprenticeship levy. There’s no extra money for these, nor is funding per pupil rising in line with inflation. The NAO warned that cuts could put students’ “educational outcomes at risk”. To make matters worse, the education services grant, worth £600m, is also being cut, which means there will be less money for local authorities or academies to provide services such as school improvement.

"What we discovered is that children need to be engaged not just at the level of the mind and body, but also the level of the soul."

The series of impact assessments of the first wave of free schools was released by the Department for Education following a request under the Freedom of Information Act. The decision to back the opening of the schools was justified in each case by a desire to respond to parental demand and foster an improvement in standards.

She has been studying the impact of music on areas like education and therapy for 25 years and has been in contact with Rotheram.

With these new courses coming out across A-levels and GCSE, staff are coming to me and saying “I want £2,500 to buy a new set of textbooks”. I say “no, I can’t afford them, find another way to do it”. With everything, you’re just trying to find ways of penny pinching. If something in the building breaks we won’t fix it unless we have to.

A report by the National Audit Office has said schools face cuts of 8% in real terms by 2019-20. While the government said school funding would be ringfenced, headteachers are facing a mountain of increased costs: higher contributions to national insurance and teachers’ pensions, the introduction of the “national living wage”, pay rises and the apprenticeship levy. There’s no extra money for these, nor is funding per pupil rising in line with inflation. The NAO warned that cuts could put students’ “educational outcomes at risk”. To make matters worse, the education services grant, worth £600m, is also being cut, which means there will be less money for local authorities or academies to provide services such as school improvement.

But can this musical revolution explain the school's improved academic results, which have seen it shoot up the performance tables?

Meanwhile, the education unions updated their campaigning website School Cuts to include the new national formula, and found that nearly nine out of 10 schools would see cuts in real terms by 2020.

Listen to World Hacks: The schools changing lives through running and music on the BBC World Service

“The finances of very low-funded schools are still insufficient to provide the service that your child needs,” the letter, due to be sent on Thursday to parents of children in 17 counties, will say.

No textbooks, no counsellor, no support for special needs. Headteachers warn the schools funding crisis cannot go on

Calculations done by the heads found that – despite the promise by the education secretary, Justine Greening, of £1.3bn extra cash – the proposal amounts to a real-terms cut of 4.6% by 2020 compared with five years earlier.

A council motion, passed on Tuesday, said: "Prior to its collapse the trust had transferred millions of pounds of schools' funding to its own centralised accounts.

Running Out Of Money Primary Schools

If you’re in education and you’re working with children you want staff who are happy and pulling together – try doing that and also saying “some of you are losing your jobs”. It has a massive effect on the children. We rely so much on our teachers; we’re an outstanding school and do loads and loads of wider curricular activities. Staff do that without charge, through goodwill. They’re not going to keep doing things like that if morale isn’t high.

Rotheram says that his pupils have enhanced concentration and memory skills.

Meanwhile, headteachers are nervously keeping an eye on proposals for a new funding formula for schools in 2018-19, expected to redistribute money from inner-city schools to rural areas. But even schools that are likely to gain under this model say any extra cash will be eaten up by increased costs.

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Responding to the findings, a DfE spokesperson said: "The introduction of the National Funding Formula from 2018-19, backed by £1.3bn of additional investment, has been widely welcomed and will put an end to historic disparities in the system. In 2016, schools in England had a net cumulative surplus of £4.3billion and now every school will see an increase in funding through the formula from 2018".

In March, the district asked the state for a $5 million loan to keep the schools running.

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Older children play more complex musical games, as well as sight-reading songs.

"It's brilliant here because I've got the chance to nurture children from the parents and babies' group all the way up to age 11. That's phenomenal, you can really develop every step of the way," he says.

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The schools were opened despite a growing capacity crisis in other parts of the country, with headteachers being forced to convert music rooms to classrooms and build temporary facilities in playgrounds. Record numbers of children are expected to be taught in classes of 31 or more from this September.

She said: “School business practitioners play an essential part in identifying innovative ways for schools to relieve these pressures and ensure financial stability and sustainability.”

I’m spending a lot of time thinking creatively about how to make money. We are having to make ourselves into marketable commodities – we’re thinking all the time about how to creatively raise funds, divert funds or not spend funds. Our PTA and fundraising events are funding our equipment. All the computers are funded through the PTA.

Commenting on the change, Gray said: “Our transition to become the Institute of School Business Leadership will provide our business professionals with stronger representation, while supporting them through our professional standards, interpretation of policy detail, accountability and regulations.”

Labour’s Angela Rayner, the shadow education secretary, said the letter showed the government was still not giving schools the resources they needed. “There is no new money and every penny has been found by cutting the education budget elsewhere,” she said.