The school has not revealed how many support staff are at risk, although the Telegraph & Argus understands it is up to 23.

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Class Teacher              Miss K Wilkinson              

"Governors and leaders in school have considered all options and their impact, and will listen to the views of all concerned through a redundancy consultation process before any final decision."

#year1 children creating their own posters to show the people they know they can trust in their own lives.… https://t.co/DLGNr4O8Ei

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“We have to give children and young people hope for the future, we have to invest in education for us to prosper. It’s scandalous and needs to change.”

Parents play an integral role within education and I am keen to further develop the links between home and school; I know that a happy, successful school depends on us working together. I believe that Frizinghall Primary School has great potential and I am determined to secure an outstanding future for the school.

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Shadow Education Minister Angela Rayner visited Wilsden Primary School to meet p<span class="truncate"><span class="truncate-preview">upils and hear about<span class="truncate-full-screen"> the challenges facing the school</span></span></span>

Abiha’s teachers say her talent might have gone unspotted in many schools, where subjects such as music and art are being squeezed out by pressure to reach Sats targets and climb league tables.

Shadow Education Minister Angela Rayner is visiting Wilsden Primary School where<span class="truncate"><span class="truncate-preview"> she had lunch.</span></span>

#year3 have been learning about #newspapers today and have been exploring what they look like

She was just five when she turned up at Feversham primary academy’s after-school clubs, leaving teachers astounded by her musical ability and how her confidence grew with an instrument in hand. Last year, Abiha successfully auditioned for Bradford’s gifted and talented music programme for primary school children, the first Muslim girl to do so. The assessor recorded only one word in her notes: “Wow!”

“We were in special measures. We had low staff morale, parents not happy with the school, results were poor and nobody wanted to come here, we had budget issues. It’s a downward spiral when you’re there. If you’re losing kids you’re losing money, then you can’t attract teachers, those you’ve got are depressed. You get monitored by Ofsted every term and it’s all about results, results, results,” he says.

Back in class, Abiha bursts into another impressive drum solo – so loud it can be heard from the playground outside. She practises at home, she explains, but only on her dad’s PS3 drum kit and on a tablet computer. Soon she hopes to upgrade to the real thing: “Now he’s going to sell that [PS3] drum kit and buy a real one. He’s making a different room with noise-proofed walls because the neighbours might report us.”

The school bases its method on the Kodály approach, which involves teaching children to learn, subconsciously at first, through playing musical games. Children learn rhythm, hand signs and movement, for example, in a way that will help their reading, writing and maths. Idrees says teachers have found that asking children to memorise passages of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, for example, improves reading and writing.

Angela Rayner, Shadow Education Secretary, visited Wilsden Primary School, meeting Reception and Year 5 pupils.

“We were in special measures. We had low staff morale, parents not happy with the school, results were poor and nobody wanted to come here, we had budget issues. It’s a downward spiral when you’re there. If you’re losing kids you’re losing money, then you can’t attract teachers, those you’ve got are depressed. You get monitored by Ofsted every term and it’s all about results, results, results,” he says.

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Class Teacher

Year 6

Princeville Primary School, Willowfield Street, Bradford, BD7 2AH. Phone 01274 573298

Assistant Headteacher &  KS1 Leader

Year 3

Bally Kaur Zara    
Mrs B Kaur

Class Teacher 

Mr D Griffiths 

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Shadow Education Minister Angela Rayner is visiting Wilsden Primary School where<span class="truncate"><span class="truncate-preview"> she had lunch.</span></span>

She was just five when she turned up at Feversham primary academy’s after-school clubs, leaving teachers astounded by her musical ability and how her confidence grew with an instrument in hand. Last year, Abiha successfully auditioned for Bradford’s gifted and talented music programme for primary school children, the first Muslim girl to do so. The assessor recorded only one word in her notes: “Wow!”

Class Teacher

Mrs Iqbal

"It is not that these staff are bad at their jobs, it is just that schools are having to change the way they budget."

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Losing Good Staff Primary Schools

After Asad’s death, Feversham piloted a project to help children deal with failure, peer pressure and media influences. “A lot of these quiet kids, they don’t know how to deal with emotions, they don’t know how to deal with negativity,” Idrees says. At its most basic, the simple act of game-playing can help children learn social skills such as eye contact and taking turns, while listening to music in an hour-long assembly helps develop their concentration in an age dominated by smartphones and tablet computers.

Some #proud children this morning earning their #gold and #silver #housepoint #certificates #workinghard

Pupils are well behaved. They want to learn. They are kind and understanding. They are proud of their school and want to do well.

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Class Teacher

Miss R Westerman

Abiha Nasir, aged nine, walks quietly into the small classroom, takes a seat, adjusts her hijab and picks up the drumsticks. A shy smile spreads across her face as she begins to play.

Councillor Ralph Berry, executive for children's services at the council, said; "Lots of schools are suffering under the coalition's funding arrangements. Because of these cuts, schools are having to manage their budgets.

Shadow Education Minister Angela Rayner is visiting Wilsden Primary School where<span class="truncate"><span class="truncate-preview"> she mad mud pies.</span></span>

The turnaround is even more notable given the makeup of the school: 99% of its 510 children speak English as an additional language, and half arrive at school unable to speak a word of English. The area outside the school gates, Bradford Moor, is one of the city’s most deprived and densely populated neighbourhoods. Nearly three-quarters of the surrounding population are of Pakistani, Bangladeshi or Indian heritage, compared with just over a quarter in the city as a whole, according to the 2011 census. A recent influx of refugees and a longer-term increase in the number of eastern Europeans has added to community tensions in an area where the city council has noted that different ethnic groups “don’t necessarily get on well or treat each other with respect”.

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