This article first appeared on Ragan.com in Feb. 2015.

This model of bottoms-up giving is a welcome change from the big foundation model which has recently been rocked by scandal. The Silicon Valley Community Foundation was the go-to foundation for The Who’s Who of Silicon Valley elite. It rode the latest tech boom to become the largest community foundation in eleven short years with generous stock donations from donors like Mark Zuckerberg ($1.8 billion), GoPro’s Nicholas Woodman ($500 million), and WhatsApp co-founder Jan Koum ($566 million). Today, at $13.5 billion, it surpasses the 80+ year old Ford Foundation in endowment size.

To this end, there is evidence to show that corporate social responsibility has a an impact on recruiting the next generation of workers. A study by Horizon Media found that 81% of millennials expect their companies to be good corporate citizens. A separate 2015 study found that 62% of millennials said they’d take a pay cut to work for a company that’s socially responsible.

When you add up the cost of employee turnover, including recruiting, hiring, and training, it makes sound financial sense to take care of your most valuable employees. Make sure you're offering them a competitive salary, and reward them with bonuses when you can. Don't wait until they ask you for a raise; proactively monitor their compensation package and make sure it grows, along with their value to the company.

Although Bright Funds is focused on transforming the individual giving experience, it’s paying customer at the end of the day is the enterprise.

8. Hoard information. Keep decision-making securely ensconced in the executive wing. Avoid empowering mid-tier managers or employees, lest they suddenly become entrepreneurial and unpredictable.

In particular, they are looking to unlock dollars from the underutilized corporate benefit of matching funds for donations, which according to Bright Funds is offered by over 60% of medium to large enterprises, but only used by 13% of employees at these companies. The need for such a service is clear — these programs are cumbersome, transactional, and often offline. Make a donation, submit a receipt, and wait for it to churn through the bureaucratic machine of accounting and finance before matching funds show up weeks later.

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If you consider an employee's paycheck as a twice-monthly recognition of a job well done, you need to step up your game. When employees work hard, getting acknowledgment from a supervisor for their efforts can make a huge difference in their morale. This isn't one-size-fits-all; different personalities respond to different forms of appreciation. Find out what is meaningful to your employees, whether it's words of affirmation, public praise in the next staff meeting, a day off, or a cash bonus. Consistently let them know you notice and value their efforts.

Bright Funds still has a lot of work to do. CEO Walrod says that one of his top priorities is to expand the platform beyond US charities, finding ways to evaluate and incorporate international nonprofits.

It’s a model that is working. According to Bright Fund’s CEO Ty Walrod, Bright Funds customers see on average a 40% year-over-year increase in funds donated through the platform. More importantly, Bright Funds not only transforms an employee’s relationship to personal philanthropy, but also to the company they work for.

The practice of offering unemployees unlimited vacation time is not uncommon in the agile tech companies of Silicon Valley, and some of the names on this list are American firms, though there are also some UK companies following suit.

That’s astonishing. It’s also lunacy when the “war for talent” continues to rage and employee costs represent a majority of corporate expenses.

What they do: HubSpot is the world’s leading inbound marketing and sales platform

Highly effective people want to know they're playing for a winning team. Make sure your values and goals are crystal-clear to create a well-defined path for everyone in your organization.

Very small employers may be unable to show that a company-sponsored charity benefits a charitable class, because the group of potential beneficiaries is too small. Companies with a few thousand or even a few hundred employees, however, should be able to satisfy the charitable class requirement, particularly if relief is available not only to current employees, but also to former employees and the families of employees and former employees. Small companies may also be able to fulfill this requirement by providing disaster relief to others in the community in addition to company employees.

In particular, they are looking to unlock dollars from the underutilized corporate benefit of matching funds for donations, which according to Bright Funds is offered by over 60% of medium to large enterprises, but only used by 13% of employees at these companies. The need for such a service is clear — these programs are cumbersome, transactional, and often offline. Make a donation, submit a receipt, and wait for it to churn through the bureaucratic machine of accounting and finance before matching funds show up weeks later.

For large- and medium-sized employers that are committed to providing relief to employees affected by disasters or personal hardships, an employer-sponsored charity offers several attractive benefits: tax deductibility of contributions, tax exemption on the charity’s income, and tax exclusion for recipients, together with the ability to focus its relief on a relatively small group of people, for example, employees and former employees of the sponsoring employer. In order to enjoy these benefits, however, employers must be careful to ensure that their sponsored charities are organized and operated according to Internal Revenue Service rules. 

9. Don’t bother with training. It’s costly, and employees will probably jump ship with their new skills. Instead, have your workers do the same tasks over and over in the very same way.

Additionally, like any corporate benefit, there should be metrics tied to employee retention. Benevity released a study of 2 million employees across 118 companies on their platform that showed a 57% reduction in turnover for employees engaged in corporate giving or volunteering efforts. VMware, one of Bright Fund’s customers, has seen an astonishing 82% of their 22,000 employees participate in their Citizen Philanthropy program of giving and volunteering, according to VMware Foundation Director Jessa Chin. Their full-time voluntary turnover rate (8%) is well below the software industry average of 13.2%.

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The first is the concept of a cause-focused “fund.” Similar to a mutual fund or ETF, these funds are portfolios of nonprofits curated by subject-matter experts tailored to a specific cause area (e.g. conservation, education, poverty, etc.). This solves one of the chief concerns of any donor — is my dollar being put to good use towards the causes I care about? Passionate about conservation? Invest with Jim Leape from the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, who brings over three decades of conservation experience in choosing the six nonprofits in Bright Fund’s conservation portfolio. This same expertise is available across a number of cause areas.

 If the group of potential beneficiaries is limited to a smaller group, such as the employees of a particular employer, the group of persons eligible for assistance must be indefinite. The IRS will consider a group indefinite where it includes not only employees affected by a current disaster, but also employees who may be affected by future disasters. Thus, a company with a single employee who lost her home in Hurricane Harvey couldn’t form a charity solely to assist that employee, but might be able to provide disaster relief to the employee through a charity formed to assist victims of Hurricane Harvey and future disasters.

To this end, there is evidence to show that corporate social responsibility has a an impact on recruiting the next generation of workers. A study by Horizon Media found that 81% of millennials expect their companies to be good corporate citizens. A separate 2015 study found that 62% of millennials said they’d take a pay cut to work for a company that’s socially responsible.