The team made its first European appearance in the 1983-84 UEFA Cup and were knocked out in the second round of the tournament by Sturm Graz. Hellas were eliminated from the 1985–86 European Cup in the second round by defending champions and fellow Serie A side Juventus after a contested game, the result of a scandalous arbitrage by the French Wurtz, having beaten PAOK of Greece in the first round.[3]

While many presume Chievo are Hellas's fiercest rivals, the Veneto derby that really raises the blood pressure is against Vicenza. Indeed Verona's promotion to Serie A last season coincided with Vicenza's slide into the lower Lega Pro league, which will have given the Veronesi untrammelled joy.

From 1898 to 1926, Italian football was organised into regional groups. In this period, Hellas was one of the founding teams of the early league and often among its top final contenders. In 1911, the city helped Hellas replace the early, gritty football fields with a proper venue. This allowed the team to take part in its first regional tournament, which until 1926, was the qualifying stage for the national title.

According to La Repubblica, a consortium of Italian bookmakers has prepared a dossier evidencing anomalous betting behaviour on five Serie A matches from the 2015-16 season.

If you're planning a longer stay, or want to see more of Italy, Verona is usefully located for Venice or for the lovely Lake Garda. It's easy to travel by public transport from the lake to Verona, so you could combine football and natural beauty if that's your taste.

Earlier this week, it was revealed how anti-mafia police in Italy had made 10 arrests in relation to a suspected manipulation of two Avellino fixtures in Serie B in 2014.

"It's true, it was my decision in January to block all the salary...

Founded in 1903 by a group of high school students, the club was named Hellas (the Greek word for Greece), at the request of a professor of classics.[2] At a time in which football was played seriously only in the larger cities of the northwest of Italy, most of Verona was indifferent to the growing sport. However, when in 1906 two city teams chose the city's Roman amphitheatre as a venue to showcase the game, crowd enthusiasm and media interest began to rise.

In 1973–74, Hellas finished the season in fourth-last, just narrowly avoiding relegation, but were nonetheless sent down to Serie B during the summer months as a result of a scandal involving team president Saverio Garonzi. After a year in Serie B, Hellas returned to Serie A.

The stadium, shared with Chievo is close to the city centre, and just a ten minute walk from Verona's main train station, Porta Nuova.

Under the leadership of coach Osvaldo Bagnoli, in 1982–83 the team secured a fourth-place in Serie A (its highest finish at the time) and even led the Serie A standings for a few weeks. The same season Hellas again reached the Coppa Italia final. After a 2–0 home victory, Hellas then travelled to Turin to play Juventus but were defeated 3–0 after extra time.

Ticket information can be found on the club website under the 'Stadio' section.

To distinguish themselves and create a hostile atmosphere, the Brigate would stop at nothing to abuse and provoke opposition fans and players. This has seen racism plague the Curva Sud. One of the more distasteful incidents back in the 1980s involved fans throwing bananas at Cagliari's Peruvian, Julio César Uribe, one of the first black players to play in Italy.

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In the 1975–76 season, the team had a successful run in the Coppa Italia, eliminating highly rated teams such as Torino, Cagliari and Internazionale from the tournament. However, in their first ever final in the competition, Hellas were trounced 4–0 by Napoli.

Key Ultra Groups: Brigate Gialloblu (Yellow and Blue Brigade)

The team's colours are yellow and blue and gialloblu (literally, "yellow-blue" in Italian) is the team's most widely used nickname. The colours represent the city itself and Verona's emblem (a yellow cross on a blue shield) appears on most team apparel. Two more team nicknames are Mastini (the mastiffs) and Scaligeri, both references to Mastino I della Scala of the Della Scala princes that ruled the city during the 13th and 14th centuries.

Villa boss Roberto Di Matteo told the club's official website: "I am very pleased to have brought in Pierluigi. We have managed to sign him despite the fact he was being chased by a number of top sides and that is a great sign.

This anecdote is taken from Tim Park's A Season with Verona and it recounts a teenage boy returning from a Verona match against Vicenza who alternates between yobbish football fan to Mamma's little angel.

Nevertheless, a game at Brescia in 1986 demonstrated their chaotic and violent tendencies. After being provoked by some Bresciani, it is thought that around 5,000 Verona fans descended on Brescia hell-bent on causing havoc. The Veronesi proceeded to ransack Brescia, vandalising the station, damaging cars and leaving a trail of destruction in their wake.

During these first few years, Hellas was one of three or four area teams playing mainly at a municipal level while fighting against city rivals Bentegodi to become the city's premier football outfit. By the 1907–08 season, Hellas was playing against regional teams and an intense rivalry with Vicenza that lasts to this day was born.

After relegation in 2001-02 they slipped further and despite good support from their loyal fans they subsided into the lower divisions. Their demise was all the more galling given that Chievo, a team from a tiny suburb of Verona had against the odds established themselves in Serie A. To the fans' relief, the team have clambered back up into competition and into Serie A.

Via Belgio 12 - 37135 Verona - Tel. +39.045.81.86.111 - Fax +39.045.81.86.112 - P.IVA 02284490238

In 1919, following a return to activity after a four-year suspension of all football competition in Italy during World War I, the team merged with city rival Verona and changed its name to Hellas Verona. Between 1926 and 1929, the elite "Campionato Nazionale" assimilated the top sides from the various regional groups and Hellas Verona joined the privileged teams, yet struggled to remain competitive.

After a three-year stay, their last stint in Serie A ended in grief in 2002. That season emerging international talents such as Adrian Mutu, Mauro Camoranesi, Alberto Gilardino, Martin Laursen, Massimo Oddo, Marco Cassetti and coach Alberto Malesani failed to capitalise on an excellent start and eventually dropped into fourth-to-last place for the first time all season on the very last matchday, enforcing relegation into Serie B.

Since 1963, the club have played at the Stadio Marc'Antonio Bentegodi, which has a capacity of 39,211.[10] The ground is shared with Hellas' rivals, ChievoVerona. It was used as a venue for the 1990 FIFA World Cup.

Although the 1984–85 season squad was made up of a mix of emerging players and mature stars, at the beginning of the season no one would have regarded the team as having the necessary ingredients to make it to the end. Certainly, the additions of Hans-Peter Briegel in midfield and of Danish striker Preben Elkjær to an attack that already featured the wing play of Pietro Fanna, the creative abilities of Antonio Di Gennaro and the scoring touch of Giuseppe Galderisi were to prove crucial.

Verona

The story is not so different from the one that unfolded at Leicester City in England last season: An unfashionable underdog shattered the sport's established...

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Again for defensive purposes a new, wider surrounding wall was built, allowing new spaces also for the future growth of the inhabited centre. The communal walls remained, to act as a second circle of defence, and in 1354 they were re-used by Cangrande II for the building of the Ponte Scaligero (Scaligero Bridge) and of Castelvecchio, a veritable defensive fortress. The economy flourished and Piazza delle Erbe was created precisely as a market place, for commerce and exchange.

Besides eating, for me the highlight of Verona is the evening passeggiata (stroll). It's a multigenerational affair. Like peacocks, the young and nubile spread their wings across the wide sidewalk promenade, made broad by the town's Venetian overloads in the 17th century so the town's beautiful people could see and be seen in all their finery.

Their return to Italy's elite has seen old rivalries reignited, notably with Chievo, Juventus, Milan, Atalanta and Napoli, the latter a fixture that brought the satirical best out of the Veronesi after they revealed a banner reading "Neapolitans… Sons of Juilet". It was a humorous response to a previously unveiled Napoli banner which taunted Verona's romantic heroine Juliet, proclaiming she was a whore.

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Historically the stadium was home solely to Hellas Verona, but after Chievo's promotion in 1986 the two clubs started to share the ground. The Hellas Verona fans outnumber Chievo's by some distance. They are the team of the Verona in their eyes and dont look fondly on the "upstarts" from the suburbs. The Verona derby is much more colourful when Hellas are at home

During the 2015–16 season, Verona hadn't won a single match since the beginning of the campaign until the club edged Atalanta 2–1 on 3 February 2016 in a win at home; coming twenty-three games into the season.[8] Consequently, Verona were relegated from Serie A.[9]

Verona has several twin towns, sister cities and partnerships around the world. Some are thematic:

It is a Jekyll and Hyde moment that portrays the capricious nature of football supporters and elements of Italian life in general. One moment you are worrying about whether you will be home in time for dinner, the next you find yourself standing in the Curva Sud of the Stadio Bentegodi screaming obscenities at opposition fans, players and, of course, officials. Just ask Tim Parks.

In 1992, Di Gennaro retired after a proud career. A league title and appearances at a World Cup have eluded some of the best players in the world; Di Gennaro was a player of distinction. When Calcio ruled the world, Di Gennaro was winning a league title with minnows Hellas and sporting some amazing bathroom attire.

The season he spent with Perugia was stable but, while three goals and 24 appearances did not set the world on fire, it did turn the heads of the Hellas Verona scouts. He signed for the club in 1981 and there was no looking back from here.

Newly promoted Serie A side Crotone fell to recently relegated Hellas Verona 2-1 in the Coppa Italia third round on Sunday.