Altona is the westernmost urban borough, on the right bank of the Elbe river. From 1640 to 1864, Altona was under the administration of the Danish monarchy. Altona was an independent city until 1937. Politically, the following quarters are part of Altona: Altona-Altstadt, Altona-Nord, Bahrenfeld, Ottensen, Othmarschen, Groß Flottbek, Osdorf, Lurup, Nienstedten, Blankenese, Iserbrook, Sülldorf, Rissen, Sternschanze.[46]

According to UEFA, HSV is currently (2013–14 season) ranked 62= among European clubs.[37]

Gisdol will be officially presented on Monday after signing a contract with the northern Germany side until the end of the season.

In the early 1990s, HSV found itself in financial trouble. The sale of Thomas Doll to Lazio for a then record 16 million Deutsche Marks[16] in June 1991 is credited with ensuring the club's survival.[17] On the pitch, meanwhile, the team was in decline. After a fifth-place finish in 1990–91, HSV finished in the bottom half of the Bundesliga in four consecutive seasons.

HSV's biggest win in a European match occurred on 23 October 1974 when they defeated Romanian team Brașov 8–0 in a UEFA Cup second round tie. Their biggest defeat was in the second leg of the 1977 Super Cup when they lost 6–0 to Liverpool at Anfield on 6 December. Manfred Kaltz with 81 has made the most appearances for HSV in Europe and Horst Hrubesch with 20 is their leading goalscorer.[37]

The 47-year-old arrives with his two assistants Frank Frohling and Frank Kaspari and will conduct...

In 1960, HSV became German champions for the first time since 1928, defeating 1. FC Köln 3–2 in the championship final. Seeler, who scored twice in the final, was named West German Player of the Year.[7]

During his first season with Hamburger SV (2000–01), Sergej Barbarez became the top scorer for his club with 22 goals and joint top scorer of the Bundesliga with Ebbe Sand.

In 1970, Seeler was named Footballer of the Year for the third time.[9] He retired at the end of the 1971–72 season in front of 72,000 fans at the Volksparkstadion.[9] He ended his career with 137 goals from 239 Bundesliga matches[8] and 507 goals from 587 appearances in all competitions.[10] In the same season, HSV played in the UEFA Cup for the first time but were knocked out in the first round by Scottish side St Johnstone.

Hamburg has an oceanic climate (Cfb), influenced by its proximity to the coast and marine air masses that originate over the Atlantic Ocean. Nearby wetlands also enjoy a maritime temperate climate. Snowfall differs a lot in the past decades: While in the late 1970s and early 1980s, heavy snowfall occurred,[11] the winters of recent years have been less cold, with snowfall on several days per year.[12][13]

HSV fans can be buried at a dedicated graveyard near the home stadium, covered in turf from the original Hamburg pitch.[34]

Hamburg's three Bundesliga championships entitle the club to display one gold star of the "Verdiente Meistervereine". Under the current award system, their pre-Bundesliga championships are not recognized and so they are not entitled to the second star of a five-time champion.

HSV's first post-war season was in the newly formed Stadtliga Hamburg and they won its championship in 1946. The club also won the championship of the British occupation zone in 1947 and 1948, the only two seasons this competition was staged.[6]

In 1981, Austrian coach Ernst Happel was appointed as Zebec's permanent replacement.[12] In his first season, his HSV side regained the Bundesliga title and reached the UEFA Cup final, where they lost 4–0 on aggregate to Sweden's IFK Göteborg.[12]

In July 2003, HSV won its first trophy in 16 years with a 4–2 defeat of Borussia Dortmund in the DFB-Ligapokal final.[22]

A third Meisterschale followed at the end of the 1982–83 season, with HSV defending their title against local rivals Werder Bremen on goal difference.[12] The same year, HSV recorded its greatest ever success, defeating Juventus 1–0 in Athens to win the club's first European Cup.[12]

The women's section was created in 1970. The team plays in the Bundesliga continuously since the 2003–04 season.

There are also the Hamburg Dockers, an Australian rules football club.[123] The FC St. Pauli team dominates women's rugby in Germany. Other first-league teams include VT Aurubis Hamburg (Volleyball), Hamburger Polo Club, and Hamburg Blue Devils (American Football).[124] There are also several minority sports clubs, including four cricket clubs.

The reserve team serves mainly as the final stepping stone for promising young players before being promoted to the main team.

After Atletico Madrid lost two Champions League finals in three years and shortened his contract, it was fair to wonder if manager Diego Simeone had taken this team as far as he could and whether he could still motivate them. Atleti, however, seem to be going forward, not backward. Their style remains...

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

Hertha's first victory in three games takes them to within three points of Bundesliga leaders Bayern Munich.

In 1967, HSV again reached the final of the DFB-Pokal where they were defeated 4–0 by Bayern Munich.[7] HSV, however, were admitted to the following season's European Cup Winners' Cup, where they lost to Milan in the final.[7]

As of 31 August 2016, according to the official website.[38] Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

Hamburger SC 1888 was founded by students on 1 June 1888. It later had links with a youth team called FC Viktoria 95 and, during World War I, was temporarily known as Viktoria Hamburg 88. SC Germania and Hamburger SC 1888 were among 86 clubs who founded the Deutscher Fußball-Bund (DFB; German Football Association) in Leipzig on 28 January 1900. FC Falke was founded by students in Eppendorf on 5 March 1906 but it was never a successful team and played in lower leagues.

After the replay of the championship final in 1922 had to be abandoned due to the opponents no longer having enough players on the ground, the German Football Association (DFB) requested HSV to renounce the title, which the club did.

Hamburg

During the Third Reich, HSV enjoyed local success in the Gauliga Nordmark, also known as the Gauliga Hamburg, winning the league championship in 1937, 1938, 1939, 1941 and 1945. At national level the club was unsuccessful with semi-final losses in 1938 and 1939 their best performances in this period. Its main rival in the Gauliga in those years was Eimsbütteler TV.

Both 1984–85 and 1985–86 were disappointing seasons for HSV with the club finishing fifth and seventh respectively. In 1986, legendary midfielder Felix Magath, who had played for the club for ten years and scored the winning goal in the 1983 European Cup Final, retired from professional football.[10]

HSV has won the German national championship six times, the DFB-Pokal three times and the League Cup twice. The team's most successful period was from the mid-1970s until the mid-1980s when, in addition to several domestic honours, they won the 1976–77 European Cup Winners' Cup and the 1982–83 European Cup. Their outstanding player was German national star Felix Magath. To date, HSV's last major trophy was the 1986–87 DFB-Pokal.

In 1997, HSV appointed Frank Pagelsdorf, who would coach the team for over four years, making him the longest serving trainer since Ernst Happel. A ninth-place finish in 1997–98 was followed by seventh in 1998–99 and third in 1999–2000,[16] the team's best performance since 1986–87.

Under new coach Bruno Labbadia, HSV reached the semi-finals of the UEFA Cup (now renamed the UEFA Europa League) for the second season in a row. However, a defeat in the away leg to Fulham days after the firing of Labbadia[27] denied the club the opportunity to play in the final, which was held at its home stadium.

Hamburg have confirmed the appointment of former Hoffenheim boss Markus Gisdol as their new coach, only hours after parting company with Bruno Labbadia.

HSV shares a cross-town rivalry with FC St. Pauli and contests the Nordderby with fellow Northern Germany side Werder Bremen. In Spring 2009, HSV faced Werder four times in only three weeks, and Werder defeated HSV in the UEFA-Cup semi-final, as well as in the DFB-Pokal semi-final.

HSV have the record in German football of having won the most regional titles, having won 31 regional titles. The regional titles do however not count as a trophy or even as a title itself. Winning a regional title only guaranteed a club to battle, with other regional winning clubs, for the German Championship.

Fink was replaced on 25 September 2013 by Bert van Marwijk,[31] who in the same season was replaced by Mirko Slomka on 17 February 2014. Under Slomka, the club narrowly avoided its first ever relegation from the Bundesliga in May 2014 by defeating Greuther Fürth on the away goals rule in a play-off.[32]

Hamburg has nine twin towns and sister cities around the world. Dar es Salaam, Tanzania became its newest sister city in 2010.(German)[133]

Labbadia has been shown the door by the German club after 18 months in charge, with his assistants Eddy Sozer and Bernhard Trares also relieved of their duties on Sunday.

As domestic football nears completion of its second full month of the 2016-17 season, James Horncastle reviews the campaign so far on the continent.

In 2007, more than 3,985,105 visitors with 7,402,423 overnight stays visited the city.[102] The tourism sector employs more than 175,000 people full-time and brings in revenue of almost €9 billion, making the tourism industry a major economic force in the Hamburg Metropolitan Region. Hamburg has one of the fastest-growing tourism industries in Germany. From 2001 to 2007, the overnight stays in the city increased by 55.2% (Berlin +52.7%, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania +33%).[103]

In December 1983, HSV traveled to Tokyo where they faced South American champions Grêmio in the Intercontinental Cup. The Brazilian club took home the trophy with a 93rd minute winning goal.[12] Back home, they lost the league championship to VfB Stuttgart on goal difference.