However, the majority of the town's pupils attend one of the seven comprehensive schools. The Priory School, formerly a grammar school for girls;[125] Meole Brace School currently carries the status of Science College; The Grange School the status of Arts College; Sundorne School the status of Sports College and Belvidere School has the status of Technology College.

The public library, in the pre-1882 Shrewsbury School building,[76] is on Castle Hill. Above the main entrance are two statues bearing the Greek inscriptions "Philomathes" and "Polymathes". These portray the virtues "Lover of learning" and "Much learning" to convey the lesson that it is good to gain knowledge through a love of learning.

The club was not loyal to the stripes for long, and in 1982 reverted to a blue shirt, then used a blue body with amber sleeves, later reverting to an amber body with blue sleeves. In 1987 the shirts radically changed to white shirts for four seasons before reverting to stripes in 1991–92. After a flamboyant abstract pattern on the shirts in 1992–93, Shrewsbury's kits have stayed mostly blue, with amber stripe(s) of some description evident since 1999.

Shrewsbury has been twinned with Zutphen, Netherlands since 1977.[51] The Royal Navy submarine HMS Talent is affiliated with Shrewsbury and the town also served as the administrative headquarters of the British Army's regional 143 (West Midlands) Brigade whose administrative HQ was based at Copthorne Barracks,[52] until 2014.

Ivan Toney had Shrewsbury's best effort but was denied by Jordan Pickford.

One Victoria Cross recipient is known to have lived in Shrewsbury; Arthur Herbert Procter, who was decorated in 1916 during World War I and retired from his later full-time clergy ministry in 1964 to briefly live at Mytton Oak Road, Copthorne.[171]

A move to the Midland Champions League in 1937–38 saw the club enjoy one of its most successful seasons, winning a league and cup treble. Shrewsbury were league champions, scoring 111 goals . In addition, the Welsh Cup was won following a replay, the team enjoyed a run in the FA Cup, and won the Shropshire Senior Cup.

Conversely, the coldest night of the year typically falls to −9.6 °C (14.7 °F)[44] – in total 61.7 air frosts are recorded in an average year. The absolute minimum of −25.2 °C (−13.4 °F)[45] was recorded in 1981.

Shrewsbury has a Park and Ride bus scheme in operation and three car parks on the edge of town are used by many who want to travel into the town centre. The three car parks are at Harlescott (to the north, colour-coded blue), Oxon (to the west, colour-coded pink) and Meole Brace (to the south, colour-coded green). It is proposed that a fourth one be built to the east of the town, at either Emstrey or Preston.[132]

Shrewsbury won the West Midlands Capital of Enterprise award in 2004.[32] The town has two large expanding business parks, Shrewsbury Business Park by the A5 in the southeast and Battlefield Enterprise Park in the north. There are many residential developments currently under construction in the town to cater for the increasing numbers of people wishing to live in the town, which is a popular place to commute to Telford, Wolverhampton and Birmingham from.[33]

The club's greatest benefactor was Hugh Eaves, a local benefactor under the stewardship of whom Bury were promoted to the second tier of English football following back to back promotions.

A potential twinning with Shrewsbury by Bayreuth, Germany, was under discussion in 2009.[174]

Shrewsbury's record victory at this ground is 7–0 against Gillingham on 13 September 2008 in League Two play.

The political make-up of the town council, as of the 2013 local elections, sees Labour as the largest party with 7 seats, and the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats both on 5. The current Mayor of Shrewsbury is Liberal Democrat councillor Miles Kenny.

There have been a number of notable Salopians, and people otherwise associated with the town of Shrewsbury, including Charles Darwin, a biologist and evolutionary theorist, one of the most important thinkers of the 19th century,[144] who was born in Shrewsbury on 12 February 1809 at the Mount House,[145] and was educated in the town at Shrewsbury School.

Shrewsbury has a comprehensive network of on-road and traffic-free cycle routes.[135] In 2008 Shrewsbury was awarded Cycling Town status by Cycling England.[136] As a result, Shrewsbury benefited from £1.8 million of grant funding from the Department for Transport between 2008 and 2011. The funding was used to make improvements to the cycle network in Shrewsbury, and to provide cycle training, information and advice to people to help encourage them to cycle to school and work.[137]

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In 2000 and again in 2002, Shrewsbury unsuccessfully applied for city status.[31]

Delay in match Joel Asoro (Sunderland) because of an injury.

The A49 also goes to Shrewsbury, joining the A5 at the south of the town, coming from Ludlow and Leominster. At this point the road merges with the A5 for 3 miles (4.8 km), before separating again to the east of the town. From there it runs north, passing Sundorne, then Battlefield, before heading out towards Whitchurch. At Battlefield, the A53 route begins and heads northeast towards Shawbury and Market Drayton then onwards towards Newcastle-under-Lyme and Stoke-on-Trent.

Shrewsbury Cricket Club is currently one of the most successful club cricket sides in the country.[citation needed] They have won the EBC National Club Championship twice in 1983 and recently in 2011. England International player James Taylor currently plays for Shrewsbury.

The club moved to the New Meadow stadium for the 2007–08 season. Peters left the club on 3 March 2008 by mutual consent,[8] replaced by Paul Simpson, who led the club to an eventual 18th-place finish in the league. After the season, the kit manufacturer Prostar earned the naming rights of the stadium.

Throughout the Medieval period, Shrewsbury was a centre for the wool trade,[60] and used its position on the River Severn to transport goods across England via the canal system. Unlike many other towns in this period, Shrewsbury never became a centre for heavy industry. By the early 1900s, the town became focused on transport services and the general service and professional sector, owing to its position on the A5 road, part of the strategic route to North Wales.[61]

Post-16 education is handled by Shrewsbury Sixth Form College, previously the Priory School for Boys[127] recently ranked 17th in the top 20 of sixth form colleges nationally by the Sunday Times newspaper and Shrewsbury College of Arts and Technology, which handles primarily vocational courses.

Bury Town recorded a 3-0 victory over Bowers & Pit...

It was in the late Middle Ages (14th and 15th centuries) when the town was at its height of commercial importance. This was mainly due to the wool trade, a major industry at the time, with the rest of Britain and Europe, especially with the River Severn and Watling Street as trading routes.[16] The Shrewsbury Drapers Company dominated the trade in Welsh wool for many years.[17]

In 2009 Shrewsbury Town Council was formed and the town's traditional coat of arms was returned to everyday use.

Located 9 miles (14 km) east of the Welsh border, Shrewsbury serves as the commercial centre for Shropshire and mid-Wales, with a retail output of over £299 million per year and light industry and distribution centres, such as Battlefield Enterprise Park, on the outskirts. The A5 and A49 trunk roads cross near to the town, and five railway lines meet at Shrewsbury railway station.

In 1998–99, Bury were relegated from the second tier on goals scored, the only team to have ever done so.

The A458 (Welshpool-Bridgnorth) runs through the town centre, entering in the west and leaving to the southeast. The A528 begins in the town centre and heads north, heading for Ellesmere. The A488 begins just west of the town centre in Frankwell and heads out to Bishop's Castle, Clun and Knighton crossing the border in the southwest of Shropshire.

Shrewsbury Town midfielder Abu Ogogo admits the players feel responsible for Micky Mellon's departure from the club as boss.

Shrewsbury is in the Shrewsbury and Atcham constituency and is the only large settlement in the constituency. At the most recent general election, in 2015, Daniel Kawczynski of the Conservative Party was elected with a majority of 9,565. Previous MPs for Shrewsbury have included 19th century Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli.[50]

Bury

The ground has conference facilities, a function area, snack bars, licensed bars, a club shop and a restaurant. Within the stadium confines are training facilities for the club and a 5-a-side football complex which is run by Powerleague.

Bury's first ever floodlit game took place on 5 November 1889, when Bury were defeated 4–5 by Heywood Central. In 1892 Bury were Lancashire Challenge Cup Winners, before joining the Football League Second Division in 1894, which they won at the first attempt and in this division they stayed until 1912. Bury's membership of the Football League from 1894 is now the 3rd longest ongoing run (after founders Preston North End and Notts County).

BBC Sport charts the progress of Shrewsbury Town Ladies, in the sixth tier but with the Women's Super League in their sights.

The forerunner of Private Eye was a school magazine edited by Richard Ingrams, Willie Rushton, Christopher Booker and Paul Foot at Shrewsbury School in the mid-1950s.[172]

Peterborough end a run of six league games without a win as they come from behind to beat Bury at the ABAX Stadium.

Gary Deegan (Shrewsbury Town) wins a free kick in the attacking half.

Town played 47 times in 2 seasons at this ground and when they moved from here, they also moved up to the Birmingham League. This ground is now allotments.