Present Day Herne Bay Herne Bay is the sort of candyfloss and coffee shop town which epitomises the best of British resorts. Generations of families have been enjoying Herne Bay's beach and safe waters denoted by the blue flag which proudly flies in the sea breeze. Colourful beach huts provide a convenient place for changing or sitting outside in deckchairs.

Herne Bay has a charming character with bayfronted Victorian houses lining the promenade. It has a traditional pier which measured 3600 feet and was the second longest in England until a storm in 1978 left it isolated out at sea. Off the coast lie a World War II fort and a wind farm.

Whether you are a resident or a visitor we hope that you will find this site both useful and informative.

Download the latest Coastal Guide for Herne Bay and Whitstable.

Relax on the beaches with a picnic or take a dip in the inviting waters. The stretch of beach towards Reculver is a haven for those looking for a peaceful hideaway.

From Dambusters to Floods, Piers to Punch & Judy, this delightful Museum & Gallery has plentry of surprises under one roof. Displays include local paintings, prints and photos, prehistoric elephant tusks and fossils from local beaches, coastal wildlife and a Barnes Wallis Bouncing Bomb protptype from World War Two.

The Reculver Towers is an imposing landmark on the Herne Bay coast. The 12th century towers are the remains of an important Roman 'Saxon Shore' fort and Saxon monastery. The adjoining Reculver Country Park is home to a large and diverse collection of plants and wildlife and offers lovely country walks.

Discover a huge variety of art and culture in Canterbury, Whitstable and Herne Bay.

In summer 1913, French artist Marcel Duchamp spent a number of weeks in Herne Bay as a chaperone to his younger sister Yvonne, who was taking a course in English at Lynton College. 1913 was a significant year in Duchamp’s development as an artist and may be said to have marked a turning point in …

For a shopping trip, there is ample convenient parking in Herne Bay. There is a large car park in William Street with 215 spaces.  Up to 1 hour costs 70p; 1 to 3 hours is £1.80; 3 to 5 hours is £2.40 and 5 to 24 hours is £4. Long stay parking is available every …

Terry Sole is one of the artists now working from a new studio at Beach House in Herne Bay.  This year Terry has a picture in the Royal Academy of Arts Summer Exhibition in London for the first time in thirty years.  The exhibition continues until 12 August 2012 in the Main Galleries, Burlington House, …

Queen Elizabeth II will be only the second British monarch to celebrate sixty years on the throne.  The last time we had a Diamond Jubilee was Queen Victoria’s in 1897.  On that occasion, Herne Bay’s celebrations involved the whole town, as this extract from the Kentish Gazette illustrates:   The Royal Naval Reserve, Foresters, Oldfellows, …

Herne Bay’s Clock tower is surely the most striking piece of architecture in the town.   It was the gift of a widow, and great benefactor to the town, Mrs Ann Thwaytes who, when visiting Herne Bay, lived at No 30 Marine Terrace. She had first suggested a Grecian Temple structure with a clock at its …

Discover walking and boat tours in Canterbury and boat trips from Whitstable Harbour.

A short bus ride from Herne Bay is Wildwood, a unique woodland discovery park and home to over 200 British animals including wolves, deer, owls, badgers, wild horses, bison, boar and many more. Ideal for children as you can experience close encounters with the animals and enjoy a woodland play area.

Herne Bay is a seaside resort situated in the South East of England.   It is approximately 7 miles (11 km) north of Canterbury and about 2 miles east of Whitstable.  It is famous for its sunsets, its safe clean beaches, and for being one of the sunniest and warmest places in the UK. During the …

Are you planning a trip to Herne Bay and wish you could arrange for someone to show you around, point out places of interest or just help you get your bearings?  Well you are in luck as there are people who offer visitors to Herne Bay that very experience – they are called Kent Greeters …

On 13 July 1912, George Smith murdered his wife Bessie while she was taking a bath at their home in Herne Bay.  He wanted to get his hands on his wife’s inheritance and for a while he almost got away with it.  After the murder George returned the bath to the shop (Adolphus Hill in …

You'll find plenty of things to do and there's something for everyone. Enjoy seaside picnics with friends and family. Enjoy the coastline, nature and wildlife on walking and cycling trails through the coastal park or visit some of the historic attractions, museums and art galleries along the cultural trail. Summer is packed full of popular events and festivals that celebrate Herne Bay's identity and for water sport enthusiasts the clean waters are perfect for sailing and jet-skiing.

Herne Bay is a sizeable seaside resort on the Thames Estuary in Kent. It lies seven miles north of historic Canterbury and is surrounded by historic castles, cathedrals and old towns making it a popular holiday destination.

The Herne Bay culture trail is an opportunity to find the historical and general places of interest in the town. Points of interest include the statue of Sir Barnes Neville Wallis, designer of the bouncing bomb, a large mural depicting famous people who have lived or been associated with the town and the notorious Ship …

Herne Bay’s newest market has today opened for business at Herne Bay United Church Hall in the High Street and has already proven to be a hit with stall holders and shoppers alike. Vanessa Hill, a chef and mother of two said “I have had a lot of interest from stallholders and there is a …

One hundred years ago Herne Bay was a buzzing seaside town and the place everyone wanted to visit.  The brand new Kings Hall was about to be opened in July by Queen Victoria’s daughter.  There were already three cinemas, The Grand, The Paragon and the Bijou and live entertainment and theatre at the Pier Theatre, …

The Central Bandstand is an ideal venue for those who enjoy café culture and is also a focal point for summer concerts, other musical events and children's entertainment.

Things to do in Herne Bay Most of Herne Bay's main attractions are centred on the shingle beach, seafront gardens and promenade. The Victorian bandstand houses the Visitor Centre and puts on summer concerts.

The Herne Bay Cultural Trail provides an opportunity to find the historical and general places of interest in the town. Points of interest include the statue of Sir Barnes Neville Wallis, designer of the bouncing bomb, and a large mural depicting famous people who have lived or been associated with the town.

Things to do in Herne Bay

 Herne Bay is part of Canterbury District’s Fairtrade Network, which is a coalition of local organisations, educational institutions, faith groups, and individuals working to promote Fairtrade in the local area.  The Network was formed in 2004 and achieved official recognition as a Fairtrade District in 2006. Fairtrade outlets in Herne Bay Conneely’s Coffee Shop 79 …

After the excitement of Halloween week, its time to start thinking about Christmas.  Herne Bay’s festive lights will be switched on in Mortimer Street on November 16th – just a week to go.  Stars from the Marlowe pantomime will be here to do the honours at 4pm next Friday. And there will be Eco Christmas …

Discover vineyards, wildlife parks and gardens in the Canterbury countryside.

There is plenty to keep the children amused with our traditional seaside entertainment including mini golf on the sea front.

The Bay Card is a loyalty and discount scheme that was launched in 2009 by Herne Bay Town Centre Management to encourage locals and visitors to shop locally and use local businesses. There are currently over 300 Businesses taking part in the scheme, with new businesses joining on a regular basis. Click here to see …

Find sporting venues in Canterbury, Whitstable and Herne Bay from cricket to golf and more.

Just a few minutes' drive from the seafront is Herne village, once the haunt of smugglers. Don't miss Herne Mill, a Grade I listed timber smock windmill dating back to the 18th century with original milling machinery and displays of milling history and memorabilia.

A pedestrian-friendly shopping centre environment is just off the seafront offering plenty of places to stop off, shop and relax, with an array of independent shops and places to eat.

Local resident, Dylan Hampshire believes that our town would be better served by a Town Council and raised this at the last Herne Bay Area Panel meeting.  Dylan believes a Herne Bay council should be independent from Canterbury and says that he only needs to gather 612 signatures from Heron Ward residents to force the …

Find out more about where to park in Herne Bay

From Owls to Otters, Badgers to Beavers, and Wild boar to Wolves, there is lots to see at Wildwood. Experience close encounters with native wildlife in beautiful ancient forest, between the Historic City of Canterbury and the pretty coastal town of Herne Bay. As a registered charity, Wildwood takes part in conservation programmes of many …

Herne Bay offers plenty of things to do from amusement arcades to watersports. Equipment can be hired for wind surfing, sailing and fishing. For those wanting to head for deeper waters, take a wildlife sailing trip from Neptune's Arm to see the nearby seal colony and sea birds in their natural habitat, or take a trip around Mansell Sea Fortress.

The dramatic twin towers of Reculver church are part of Herne Bay’s skyline and you can see them wherever you stand on the beach. The site is now managed by English Heritage and you can walk or cycle the three miles from Herne Bay to the ruins along the coastal path.  The towers were built …

The Wildart Trail is an art & sensory experience on an all access path close to the car park on Thornden Wood Road, between Canterbury and Herne Bay, with space for blue badge holders and people with young children to park on the same side of the road as the trail. Features on the trail …