R2_Amazeballs6 months ago

Are you looking for the most effective sales team for your start-up business? Startups gives you advice on employing staff, and what to look for in a sales team.

Col Minessota5 months ago

Growing Business is the UK’s leading online magazine for the founders and owner-managers of fast-growth businesses. Part of the most comprehensive resource for people starting, running, and selling a business, since 2001, Growing Business has delivered all the latest news and deals involving British companies employing up to 500. Covering angel investment, venture capital, the London Stock Exchange’s AIM market, international growth and business exits the site also features profiles of the UK’s most successful entrepreneurs, plus the insights and opinions of the nation’s foremost business experts.

Mary4 months ago

https://www.gov.uk/employing-people-to-drive You must make sure that anyone you employ to drive a vehicle has the right licence and qualifications. ???  

Bri19874 months ago

Hello to all Employers, I need help please from employers willing to share their experiences of employing young people straight from an educational institution. I am specifically researching why there appears to be a very high "fall out" of young people who having successfully gained their first job, simply go on to leave within a year. Please give examples irrespective of reason for leaving be it they were dismissed or simply left of their own accord. (Did you later wish you had kept them on?) I am collating information to enable a comprehensive paper on this very subject. Please send me personal stories of both your bad and good experiences of employing a young person who left your business in their first year. Note: The report is aimed specifically at the first 12 months of a youngsters working life. The study will attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of existing work carried out by schools, colleges and universities in the preparation of students for a life in the workplace. However, the main objective is to help young people become employable so that they can enjoy a successful and productive career. (Remember; good experiences are also welcome) Pease supply examples of "First time job seekers/employees" specifically: 1) Poor Job applications. 2) Bad Interview experiences. 3) Bad examples of a young person’s general work ethic and/or performance/behaviour. 4) Incidents leading to young person dismissal. 5) Incident/s or reason why the young person left your employment. (Comments will be treated as anonymous upon request) Email: denis at the bridge to work . org Many thanks in anticipation Denis East  

Pete_W4 months ago

If you employ people to work for your business and they receive at least £112/week (Lower Earnings Limit for National Insurance), or your company uses subcontractors for construction work, you are legally required to register as an employer. Furthermore, you must also register if you wish to pay yourself a director’s salary because, technically, you are employing yourself and will be required to pay tax and National Insurance on your salary income.  

Gary19964 months ago

Paying for SEO is okay if you can find someone good to do it. As webgeek said, it is not as easy as some think. Employing the wrong person to do it would be a bit like using a local tennis champion instead of asking Andy Murray to play. You might win a few points but you won't win the match. There are hundreds of people / companies out there who make glorified claims about their SEO capabilities but in the end, many of them are useless. We have just completely revamped our website and I am in the process of doing basic on-page optimisation (i.e. unique title tags, repeating keyword phrases in headers and main text etc.) but when that process is complete I will be looking into hiring an expert to fine-tune it because, frankly, I haven't the time to do it but it IS important. Do your homework before hiring someone to make sure you get a person who comes highly recommended by people with identifiable results.  

Pete_W4 months ago

Employing an apprentice can be a great way of boosting your business; 96% of employers who take on an apprentice report benefits to their business whilst 72% report improved productivity as a direct result of employing an apprentice. They play a vital role in equipping young people with the skills they need to succeed in the labour market and build a rewarding career. The current government has prioritised apprenticeships; with 1.5 million apprenticeship starts since 2010.

Gary19964 months ago

Hi Guys I posted an advert for a new childcare apprentice and on the advert put apprentice training wage. One of the places we advertised was the local jobs facebook page. Under the comments (which usually are just people tagging mates) was a couple of people complaining about the apprenticeship wage and how anyone can live off 3.40 an hour (we pay more but that's the assumption they made). I wanted to open up the discussion to see what you guys thought. I have a team of 6 and we have 1 apprentice at any one time (sometimes there is a short crossover if we recruit quickly and awaiting certificates). We could have no apprentices however I don't really like the college sit and read about childcare and don't get paid v's the training, on the job experience and the pay. We have gone through a few apprentices because they are not willing to do the paperwork side of the training, "childcare is easy because you just play with kids" attitude after the initial novelty of the job has worn off and they dont like cleaning. We also have had some great ones who are now fully trained up members of staff earning a couple of quid more than min wage. The flip side is whilst the wages are lower and government grants help, there is so much work behind an apprentice that sometimes i think about just employing qualified and experienced staff. So my question is, do you feel the wages are exploitative or a great way to start a career in your chosen field whilst earning something?  

Corrie19994 months ago

ive been reading the forums but all the information is a bit overwhelming, so I thought it best to ask, sorry if it's been covered. I've been in business for over 6 years, the first 4 on my own, the last 2 my wife joined me, but now I'm thinking of taking on another person to free me up so I can concentrate on getting more traffic to the website. But what is the "real" cost of employing someone? The way I look at it is for example if I paid someone £1k p/m I would have to sell an extra £4K to cover them, I haven't worked it out exactly. At this time of year it's busy but during the summer some days I can manage on my own, so I guess I'm thinking of zero hours, I'm not keen on zero hours contracts but it seems the best option at the moment. Any advice would be appreciated.  

Fireboy4 months ago

I have a meeting with a socilicitor this week to arrange various contracts to be written up (employment contracts, sub-contractor contracts & b2c service agreement). Before my meeting I thought it would be a good idea to clue myself up as to not waste any time in the meeting. My family run company is in the process of pretty quick expansion, we're scaling quite well and we're in the process of setting an office up to accommodate inbound call center-esque staff. (these staff will slowly be trained up to almost run and operate the whole company, being a great opportunity for promotions as new positions become availible) The 'call operator' staff will: - Take inbound calls & dispatch/schedule our field engineers - Talk directly with engineers - Chase invoices - Take payments over the phone - General customer service, queries etc. Having never employed before, we're only just coming to terms with all of the requirements and legalities that come with being an employer. Questions/Advice Needed (possible terms including in the employment contract?) - How will we terminate employment for staff that aren't meeting our expectations/requirements? - What employment terms give us the most control, as an employer, for a job like above? - What are the industry standard models/contract terms for employing staff for positions like this? I don't know enough about employment yet to know what questions to ask, although the feeling of losing control of my overheads by employing a low achieving staff member is a pretty scary thought. I'm not entirely fixated on poor performing employees, and we have every intention to create an environment for them to thrive and succeed within the company... but it's still scary nonetheless!  

FordOwner4 months ago

I'm setting up a small delivery business with very competitive prices working business to business to begin with. My prices are much cheaper than larger companies like Hermes etc. and I have quite a few business already interested in working with me. For the drivers I was initially thinking to hire 'man with van' services to keep the capital low in case it doesn't work and i have loads of vans on my hand... But i was also thinking of employing people on a 0 hour contract to do some deliveries also but they would need to use their personal car and I need some help on understanding how employing people would work... what are the legal requirements and how would i go about employing people? Also with them using their own car what can legally claim back from my business? This may sound silly for some people but I've never gone about hiring someone before!  

Porker4 months ago

I have a friend from New Mexico, USA whom I want to employ. This is a work from home situation as the company I'm starting is an online business. How would I go about employing him as a worker? Would he need a working visa from the UK? Are there any easy alternatives to employing him (eg. him becoming a freelancer in the industry)? This situation has bugged me for a while and I wasn't able to find a lot of useful information elsewhere.  

FordOwner4 months ago

Well it will allow me to increase the wages of my ex-apprentice who is my current assistant in the business. I've been encouraging her to look elsewhere because I don't feel I can pay her enough in relation to the work she does. She likes the business and wants to stay. The bit I'm saving can go to her and I'm happy with that. Yes essentially we do need more customers of course. N.B. Outsourcing works better for some types of businesses than others. As a bricks and mortar shop there is only so much we can outsource and the results of doing so haven't always been so good. Employing people carries many problems with it but you can work at improving the skills of your employees when you outsource it is a bit of a case of take it or leave it.  

Gary19964 months ago

I am thinking of employing a 16 year old school leaver (not an apprentice) are there any special rules/considerations about employing someone so young?  

Red4 months ago

It’s an exciting time when your business gets to the stage of employing additional staff; as your success grows, so must your business.

Col Minessota4 months ago

If you’re new to business, or are looking to take on staff, this may give you a useful insight into some of the things you’ll have to think about when employing people.

FordOwner4 months ago

There are 7 things you need to do when employing staff for the first time.

Pete_W4 months ago

I wouldn't say a cleaning company is outsource if you're cleaning your own premises, I think that's a business service is it not. Ok it might be outsource in the real sense but you're taking it a little literally. When you talk about outsource you're talking about employing a company to take charge of a project, it might be big or small. You've identified the project and what you want doing, but how they do it (decisions) is up to them. So you do lose some control, but how important that control is is negligible. Particularly as you've probably appointed someone who knows more about the technical side of the project than yourself.  

Corrie19994 months ago

Is it really that simple that as long as I employ somebody for just 1 week before April 2017 that I can get my full employment allowance? What's the catch in just employing someone to do virtually anything, putting them on payroll and paying them £160? Is any employers NIC that have been paid throughout the year returned at end of year?  

R2_Amazeballs4 months ago

Hi Everyone We are a small SME and are thinking of employing a salesperson to increase business. We have never employed a salesperson before and I am confused at the salary/commission structure. We are looking for someone with proven sales experience so do we pay a low basic salary + Commission if so how do I know what the commission rate are and what is the best way to do this? Also do we have to provide the car or can we pay mileage? Any advice very much appreciated  

Red4 months ago

Many apologies for not replying I have been busy working and in meetings regarding this plus becoming a grandmother so I have been a bit swamped. We are interested in crowd funding but none of us have much idea about it or how to go about it, we tried it but it did not work as I don't think our pitch was particularly great if I'm honest. We have been busy trying to obtain advice from business gateway etc about which would be the best way to register the company, social enterprise, charity not for profit etc and I must confess it's a mine field of information. We are no clearer in our minds as to which way to go. We don't think charity is the solution because the idea is to work there ourselves and help some of the other carers get off of benefits, as well as employing people on the spectrum. We have been in the newspapers already and they have expressed a wish to do a follow up and we have been contacted by stv as this has never been done before but we feel we have come to a standstill at the moment. We are a community group not experts so we admit we are struggling. The plan is to open a sensory restaurant, employ people on the spectrum and carers enabling them into work by offering flexible working hours. Obviously we would love to open more restaurants around the uk in the future. Make Autasty a high street name as research shows this is a much needed service but the idea is one thing!  

Watergirl4 months ago

I'm an IT professional and been working mainly in IT sector for over 12 years. Now, I'm keen to start up something of my own. However, dont know where to start. I own a limited company which hold Tier 2 Sponsor License (Work Permit License) from Home Office which I'm looking to make use of. This allows employing non EEA/EU workers into the company. I'm looking to start own business and quite open to ideas and what we can do. I'd welcome to have a partner if anyone has a business idea and can benefit from my license, I'm happy to work with them. Thanks Hummad  

Pete_W4 months ago

So long as you are aware of the risks of using freelancers and have a back up plan then thats okay. HOWEVER, we employ freelancers all of the time, as in give them full time jobs (freelancing for many is stop gap before eventually opting for the security of full time employment). I've had clients left in limbo whereby their entire online business was in the hands of a single person (a freelancer) who decided to simply stop freelancing (and left his clients high and dry) - I've seen it where people have got ill (or worse), have gone into full-time employment and even one that decided to travel the world (seriously) and was only available to contact on the odd occasion he went into an internet cafe. Freelancers are often cheaper than employing a company, but there are big risks associated with using freelancers and you need to make sure you have a back up plan should that freelancer simply vanish one day (because it does happen, I've seen it).  

Porker4 months ago

Hi, Sorry to hear that your firm is being sold, but it's good that you are looking on this as an opportunity to do something for yourself. My initial advice would be to do it. Speak to one other person you think may be interested in helping you and see if they want to do it with you. As you take more work on you will always be able to take subcontractors on to help. This could be a cheaper and less risky option compared to employing lads from day one. As far as marketing the business we have always been big believers in local networking groups, such as BNI. They are great to meet other local business owners and a great way to spread the word about yours. The next thing I would do is put together a Cashflow projection to get an idea of how much money you think you may need to set up; for tools, van, signage, marketing etc. We would be happy to help you with this, or if you would like to chat about any other questions relating to starting up please don't hesitate to contact us free of charge. Good luck Simon Forbes Watson Forbeswatson.co.uk  

Corrie19994 months ago

sirearl said: ↑ Not even a tiddly bit for all the privileges you enjoyed growing up in the UK. EarlClick to expand... But Earl, don't you bang on about how we are so rich compared to the Third World, and how we should help the very poor peoiple there? What better way than to help them on the way to prosperity by employing them?  

Matchmaker14 months ago

I agree a social enterprise model is definitely one to consider . However, I'm not sure whether crowd funding is the right model - but perhaps your research shows otherwise. Speak to Social Enterprise UK and The Autistic Society who will be able to offer advice and support. Does anyone in your group have experience of managing/running a restaurant and/or a business. This will help provide credibility and confidence that you have the skills to make this work. By the way this has been done before. There are quite a few not for profits that already have cafe's and restaurants which are set up employing people with learning and//or physical disabilities. Have you looked at how they operate? The Camden Society is one.  

Matchmaker14 months ago

Hello A while ago I received a Deductions from Earnings notice for one of my employees. On reading the paperwork that came with it I found that I didn't have to comply with it as we are a micro business employing less than 10 people. I have now received an Attachment of Earnings Order for a different employee, this time there is nothing that says micro businesses don't have to comply with it. My question is does anyone know if there is a difference between a Deductions from Earnings Notice and an Attachment of Earnings Order, or does the same exemption for micro businesses apply to both. I have searched the internet and can't seem to find anything that answers my qustion. Thanks in advance for any help.  

Matchmaker14 months ago

butlerservice said: ↑ @TheByre what if it doesn't work out after a month? Also, what kind of tasks should I give them during the one day? It almost takes a day to explain the operational side etc... Any tips on things I definitely need to keep in check?Click to expand... Employing people is a HUGE subject and not one I can cover in a posting. I would be learning, learning, learning and reading any and every book on the subject. As for what to do if it does not work out. "Sorry, but it i not working out. You spend too much time, playing with your phone and texting friends and you have not sold a damn thing this month! Goodbye!" is a lot better than trying to make things work when the employee is obviously dead weight. As for what task on a trial day - well, that depends on the business. You say 'creative sector' but could be anything from advertising to writing texts or selling soap. When I was interviewing journalists, I would give them an hour to write an article. When I was interviewing translators, they got an hour to translate a text. On the one day gig, they got a usual day's work. I your case, as you are looking for a sales person, get them to sell something. Things to watch out for - wow! That's a long list. Texting. Chatting, instead of working. The killer is for the employee to explain to me why something didn't get done or didn't happen, instead of coming back with the job done. The worst any employee can do IMO is to explain why he/she failed. And "I screwed up!" is far, far better than some brilliant explanation as to why it was not their fault! That is the biggest alarm signal (IMO) to watch out for!  

FordOwner4 months ago

HI ,This is my first time on this forum and i hope i don't show my lack of experience in buisness,but i am trying all avenues to make my new buisness successful for myself and my family. I have been set up for only 8 weeks as a landscape gardener after over 20 years experience and was fed up of making other people money.I felt i never achieved what i was capable of in life and plan to change all that. I advertise in my local paper and have distributed leaflets and have not had a day off yet.I would like to know at what stage should i be thinking of employing someone and was hoping someone could offfer me help in this route and would there be any financial help available to me.I look forward to picking your brains and would welcome any suggestions.  

Porker4 months ago

Employing

Good Morning The recently launched Youth Wage Incentive is a Government grant which allows businesses to claim up to £2,275.00 for employing an 18-24 year old currently particpating on the Department for Work & Pensions' (DWP) Work Programme. Unlike previous Government employment programmes, the Work Programme does not consist of the long term unemployed - so there are some excellent candidates out there. Because I have not yet made 15 posts I am unable to post a direct link, but information can be found on the DWP website. (Please DM me for the link if required) I am particularly looking to hear from employers and businesses in West & South Yorkshire who may be interested in learning more or utilising the Youth Wage Incentive. Kind Regards  

petHead4 months ago

"There are some positive measures in today's speech to help reduce the costs of doing business."With fuel duty frozen, £1,000 rebate on business rates and a subsidy on employing young people, there are measures worth thousands to small businesses. Within a time of constrained budgets, it's good to see the Chancellor has listened to the concerns of small businesses around rising costs. "Of course there are other issues not addressed directly today, but upon which work is ongoing. Top amongst these is energy prices. We are working hard to ensure members benefit from any reining back of green taxation."

FordOwner4 months ago

Hi Guys! I am about to become self employed in the new year by bringing to market a new software application and was just looking for a bit of advice on the tax side of things. If anyone can help me out that would be great! I am employing a software developer I know to work as a freelancer to help me build the first version of a web application in the new year. He will be working part time for a few months and will cost me approx £15k in fees. If things go well we will be forming a limited company with equity together, if not then I will own the ip and we can go our separate ways. Instead of starting with the hassle of forming a Ltd company straight away I am planning on starting up as a sole trader on my own to start with and change the business structure later if we get to the point of assigning equity. I am working full time and all my earnings for the rest of this tax year will be in the 40% tax bracket. The accounts for my first 3 months in the new year will only consist of costs of the freelancer development fees. Does anyone know if I will I be able to offset costs these against my other personal income on my 2016/17 tax return, and effectively receive a 40% relief on my investment? (sideways loss relief?) Or is it more complected than that as it could be seen that the new program is an asset or a capital expenditure? Also, if I did this, would there be any other tax implications when changing structure to a limited company? Might be a question for another forum but would it make sense just to go straight down that path at this stage? Many thanks in advance for anyone who can help. You guys are brilliant help especially for new cash strapped potential entrepreneurs like myself!  

Bri19874 months ago

Maggistar666 said: ↑ I'm after some advice. I started a little cleaning business just to fit in with the kids when I got divorced. It's now a 5 star rated business and I have kept every customer. The problem is I can't give it any more hours than I already do and my friend would like to buy half of the business. How do I do this?? How much would it charge. I am turning work down on a daily basis so I know there's plenty of work?? It earns roughly £165 one week and the following week it earns £185. It differs slightly as some people have fortnightly cleans. It's been running since June 2016. Any advice would be gratefully received xxx feel free to ask for more info xxxxClick to expand... Maggie how do you want to develop the business? Are you happy working as you are or would you like to build a business employing staff to work for you? I've been an accountant for many years and its VERY rare that I see two friends go into business and remain friends.  

R2_Amazeballs4 months ago

I've set up a sole trader business on the side of my Ltd co and I am looking to employ a P/T (min 25 hours p/w) or F/T sales employee. Mainly telephone sales, but the employee will also do some door to door sales/enquiries - targeting local shops, and they will also be free to have meetings with potential clients. I would initially be looking at a 3 month contract, with a view to extending it, as long as it is working well. As far as I am aware I need to: 1) Decide how much to pay 2) Get Employer's liability insurance & public liability insurance 3) Write a written statement of employment 4) Tell HMRC 5) Sort out a workplace pension scheme of they qualify I'm looking for advice on anything to do with the above and employing (for the first time). I have been quoted £300 (inc) by a solicitor for a Contractor Agreement if I go down the P/T route. Is this fair? Are there templates out there, where I could set this up myself without having to pay for it? Any advice would be gratefully accepted!  

Gary19964 months ago

Founded in 2004 when founder Piers Daniell was just 22, Fluidata has become a major player in the telecommunications sector, providing high-speed internet and connectivity solutions to more than 1,000 clients including O2, Cisco and Vodka Revolution. Now employing 52, the London-based company has seen especially strong growth in recent years. In its last set of accounts the company generated revenues of £10.2m (a rise from £7.2m) – and over £1m in profits. It is set to reach sales of £13.8m within the next 12 months. Fluidata’s commitment to quality was reflected by the company being awarded the Internet Provider’s Association Award two years running and receiving ISO accreditation for the environment and quality.

Gary19964 months ago

If she has been an employee for 2 years or more she is entitled not to be dismissed from her employment except for a fair reason. In this case, that would be redundancy, because the company employing her is closing. However, if the new company he is setting up does exactly the same as the old company, she may have an entitlement to be transferred as an employee to the new company under TUPE. He really needs to speak to an experienced employment lawyer. I cannot help with regard to the shareholding etc.  

Watergirl4 months ago

Outsourcing cleaning services can save much time and money. For the small business, employing contract cleaners is probably the easiest and most hassle-free way of getting the job done.

Porker4 months ago

You cannot make your company dormant for such a short time. You will need to keep doing RTI returns. HMRC advice on what to do if no payroll is being run as no staff are being paid for a number of months is at the bottom of this page. https://www.gov.uk/stop-employing-staff  

Mary4 months ago

Hi everyone, I hope you are all well? My name is Mike, I am the digital director at Blue Frontier and looking forward to contributing to UK Business Forums. Blue Frontier offer end to end digital services now employing over 30 staff, based in Salisbury, Wiltshire.  

Mary4 months ago

It’s the start of the year, and a time when businesses will be reviewing or putting in place holiday procedures. As a small business owner, you will understand that an employee’s annual leave can impact on your company. Therefore, managing staff holidays efficiently is vital and will help your business enjoy maximum success throughout the year. Owning a small business will require you to fulfil a number of roles; some of which you may feel less comfortable about managing than others. Areas of employment law – including the management of staff holidays – can seem daunting at first, and as a result you may look to outsource your HR function or turn to costly advice for support. However, complying with employment legislation is simpler than you think and the government is at hand to offer free advice to all small businesses when taking on employment related HR issues. For information which clearly articulates how bosses can manage their employment obligations themselves, visit www.businesslink.gov.uk/employingpeople As an introduction, outlined below are four top tips to help you manage staff holidays yourself. Holiday entitlement

Corrie19993 months ago
This topic has been discussed elsewhere
- see here